Job Candidates

 Take a look at the UMKC Economics job candidates in our Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program.

 

Dai Duong

 
Expected Completion
Fall 2019
Field(s) or Research Interests
Development Economics, Political Economy, Marxian Economics
Dissertation Title
“Working as an End: The Importance of Autonomy of Labor in Shaping Human Development”
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Dai Duong is a Ph.D. student in Economics and Social Science Consortium at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC). He is also a lecturer of Political Economy at the Viet Nam National University of Agriculture, Viet Nam. He received three Master degrees in Political Economy (from the University of University of Economics and Business, Vietnam National University, Hanoi), Development Studies (from the International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University of Rotterdam, Netherlands), and Economics (from UMKC).

Dai is interested in applying development economics, political economy, and Marxian economics to explore and tackle urgent issues such as human development, unemployment, the alienation of labor, inequality, commodification, and commodity fetishism. His dissertation is focused on broadening the concept of human development and improving its measurement by taking into account the autonomy of labor. He aims to raise more attention of academia and policy makers in creating legal frameworks and working environments that support and improve working people’s autonomy of labor, which, in turn, allow to achieve and sustain a high degree of human development for people.

In 2017, he published an article on human development and alienation in the context of economic crisis in Viet Nam in the Capital and Class Journal. Recently, among the most promising young researchers, he won the first prize for the research paper at the tenth Vietnam Economist Annual Meeting Workshop 2017. The paper is titled as “Return to education in contemporary Vietnam”. Besides, Dai is the grader in two courses “Introduction to Urban Studies” and “Cities of the World” at UMKC Department of Architecture, Urban Planning, and Design.

Since 2006, as a lecturer in Viet Nam, Dai has taught Marxism and Leninism Political Economy for first-year undergraduate students. He also played an important role in writing papers, doing surveys, and managing research projects: Difficulties in transition of livelihoods in rural areas under industrialization; Agricultural land conversion for industrialization: livelihood along rural-urban continuum and mechanism of social differentiation in Hung Yen province, Viet Nam; Engendering the agricultural land use and labor migration in social differentiation in Red River Delta region Viet Nam; and Human development in North-Eastern region during 1999-2009, Viet Nam.


Hongkil Kim

Expected Completion
Fall 2018
Contact
+1 (913) 325-7298
Field(s) or Research Interests
Macroeconomic Theory, Monetary Theory and Policy, Money and Banking, International Finance, Econometrics
Dissertation Title
“Three Essays on Public Money Creation, Endogenous Bank Credit Creation and Remaining Empirical Issues: Interest Rates and Inflation”
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Hongkil Kim is a Post Keynesian macroeconomist working in the areas of macroeconomics and money and banking. His research is focused on money/credit creation and its empirical relevance to macroeconomic variables such as inflation and interest rates (asset prices).

It would proceed to suggest policy proposals that guide credit creation and allocation of credit for productive purposes and assign a proper role for public money creation in both developed and developing countries, His works are currently being reviewed in heterodox journals such as Journal of Post Keynesian Economics and Review of Keynesian Economics.

Brian Matlock

headshot of student

Expected Completion
Field(s) or Research Interests
Fields: Urban/Regional Economics, Development Economics
Research Areas: Economic Development, Nonprofit Industry, Critical Management Studies, Political Economy, Economic Sociology
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Jonathan Ramse

Expected Completion
Summer 2018
Contact
+1 (503) 554-2801
Field(s) or Research Interests
Economic Development
Dissertation Title
“Capital Transformations in Community Economic Development”
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Jonathan Ramse is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics at George Fox University in Newberg, OR. He joined the university as an instructor of economics in 2016. He teaches principles of macroeconomics and microeconomics, intermediate microeconomics, global political economy and international finance. Previously he worked at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) as a graduate teaching assistant for two and a half years. He also spent the fall 2016 semester as an adjunct instructor of economics at Park University in Parkville, Missouri. Jonathan is a PhD candidate in the economics program at UMKC, with an expected completion in the summer of 2018. His research involves applying the critical institutionalist approach to issues related to community economic development. Other areas of research and teaching interest include: international development, international trade and finance and institutional economics. He holds a master’s degree in economics (2014) from UMKC as well. His bachelor’s degree in economics and international relations came from Wartburg College in 2007.

Ruchira Sen

three econ students talking to each other

Expected Completion
Spring 2018
Field(s) or Research Interests
Feminist Political Economy, Political Economy of Development, History of Economic Thought.
Dissertation Title
“The Reproduction of the Empire of Capital Through the Incursions of Capitalist Processes into Non-Capitalist Processes Since 1989”
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Ruchira Sen has defended her PhD dissertation on March 23, 2018. Her dissertation presents a non-capitalocentric framework to the neoliberal Empire of Capital, studying the historical development of empire from the viewpoint of households and States. Her focus is the commodification of the bodies and labor of women. Sen substantiates the claim that households and State systems are not only sites of the Triple Movement between the incursions of capitalist processes and the resistance of non-capitalist processes, but they are also sites of identity politics and conflict. As evident, Sen is heavily influenced by (though she is occasionally critical of) Rosa Luxemburg, Gibson-Graham, Hardt and Negri, Prabhat and Utsa Patnaik, David Harvey and Nancy Fraser.

Sen thoroughly enjoys teaching. She has taught three sections of Introductory Macroeconomics and one section of Intermediate Microeconomics. Her teaching evaluations have won her the Graduate Teaching Assistant Superior Teaching Award in 2016. Sen has also served as Teaching Assistant for two sections of Introductory Microeconomics and for two graduate classes -History of Economic Thought and Political Economy of Race, Class and Gender- where she led vibrant discussion sessions on Smith, Ricardo, Sraffa and Marx, Feminist Postcolonial Political Economy and Theories of Racial Discrimination. Sen uses creative teaching methods such as classroom games for Intermediate Microeconomics, reference to context analysis for Introductory Macroeconomics and comparative theoretical analysis for History of Thought and Political Economy.

Currently, Sen is working on a book section with Viviana Grieco, Associate Professor of History at UMKC, on “Global Networks of Care -Women’s Work and Immigrant Families in the Midwest” where they contrast time sent in housework and care by Latinos and Latinas (from the American Time Use Survey) and investigate the support Latinx families in the midwestern United States give to and receive from their countries of origin, in terms of care work. Clara Irazabel-Zurita, Director of the Latinx Studies Program at UMKC, has invited Grieco and Sen to contribute their work to her forthcoming collection of essays.

Sen is also working on a paper with Mathew Forstater, examining the genealogy of the notion of the socio-material provisioning process as the subject of inquiry in Political Economy. Forstater and Sen believe that distinguishing material provisioning from its social aspect leads to theoretical inaccuracies and thereby, attempt to reconcile socio-materiality with the concept of materialism in Classical Political Economy.

In addition to her PhD, Sen also has a Master of Philosophy (MPhil) and a Master of Arts (MA) degree from Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India. Her MPhil dissertation examines the vertical disintegration of the textiles, garments and leather industry in India into smaller, informal units. On the basis of National Sample Survey Organization data, she suggests that these industries are making inroads into household production, where homes are becoming sites of production for global markets. While in JNU, Sen was inspired by student and women’s movements of which she was an active part. Currently, Sen is a Research Fellow for the Binzagr Institute for Sustainable Prosperity. She also volunteers for Kansas City’s Global and Multicultural Education and follows URPE, ICAPE and IAFFE.


Neal J. Wilson

student portrait

Expected Completion
Fall 2018
Field(s) or Research Interests
Health, Political Economy, Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Dissertation Title
“Childhood Lead Poisoning and The Lived Environment”
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Neal Wilson is a Research Fellow at the Binzagr Institute for Sustainable Prosperity, and a Ph.D. Candidate in Economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City. Since 2014 he has been a research consultant for the Center for Economic Information where he focuses on the application of Geographic Information Systems towards a better understanding of health disparities. Neal’s research focuses on the relationship between childhood lead poisoning and the lived environment, environmental policy as a form of social policy, and modeling urban environmental inequality. Prior to perusing his Ph.D. Neal co-founded the Museum of Bottled Water and spent a decade as a craft baker.