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    Six MA Students in the UMKC History Department win National Council on Public History Award for Student Project

    The UMKC Department of History is proud to announce that six graduate students in the Master of Arts in History with a Public History Emphasis program have been awarded the National Council on Public History's Student Project Prize for their project, Making History: Kansas City and the Rise of Gay Rights. The UMKC students receiving the award are: Taylor Bye, Kathryn Carpenter, Samantha Hollingsworth, Leah Palmer, Kevin Ploth, and Jennifer Tufts.

    The award is given to “an outstanding public history student project initiated as academic coursework and implemented and recognized beyond the classroom for its contribution to the field of public history.”

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    Inscribing Yourself into a Nazi Future: Love Letters in the Third Reich

    Detlef Schmiechen-Ackermann, Marlis Buchholz, Bianca Roitsch, Karl H. Schneider, Christiane Schröder, Hrsg. Der Ort der “Volksgemeinschaft” in der deutschen Gesellschaftsgeschichte. Paderborn: Ferdinand Schöning, 2018. https://www.schoeningh.de/katalog/titel/978-3-506-78648-7.htmlSince 2011, Andrew Stuart Bergerson, Professor of History & Public Humanities, has been one of the lead researchers for a project called Trug&Schein. It uses the correspondence of an ordinary German couple, Hilde Laube and Roland Nordhoff, to facilitate public engagement with everyday life over the course of the Second World War.

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    UMKC History Professor Reconstructs the History of Surgery before Anesthesia

    The Best Surgeon in England: Percivall Pott, 1713-88Lynda Payne publishes new book about "the best surgeon" in 18th century England.

    The University of Missouri-Kansas City’s History Department is proud to announce the publication Professor Lynda Payne's new book, The Best Surgeon in England: Percivall Pott, 1713-88, about the influential English surgeon Percivall Pott, whose practice of surgery was praised for being methodical, skilled and measured.

    Payne, a specialist in the history of science and medicine, challenges the belief that the practice of surgery prior to the invention of general anesthesia was “a realm of screaming patients and larger than life eccentric medical men whose primary aims were to operate as fast as possible.” The goal of her new book is to humanize and historicize medical practices by looking at the biography of this landmark teacher and practitioner.

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