A collage from several courses

Courses

Fall 2017 LLAS Courses

LLS 201 Introduction to Latinx and Latin American Studies

Instructor: Dr. Theresa Torres

MWF 10:00 to 10:50 am

This course addresses and examines the social, economic, and political factors that have influenced the historical experiences of Latinxs in the U.S. Attention will focus on the major concepts, issues and debates in the field of Latinx and Latin American Studies. Particular consideration will be given to an analysis of factors that have influenced the past and present status of Latinxs in U.S. society. Examples of the types of topics to be discussed include affirmative action, art, English-only policies, identity, immigration, music, racism, politics, sexism and stereotyping. Other topics discussed will be based on student interest. This course is offered every semester and LLAS instructors take turns to teach it.

LLS 300-0005 Special Topics: Political Economy of Latin American Development

Instructor: Alejandro Garay-Huamán

MW 4:00 to 5:15 pm

This course introduces both history and theory of the political economy of Latin American development. It provides students with a theoretical and empirical foundation for understanding the economic, political, social and cultural dynamics of Latin America within the global capitalist system. We will discuss the notion of development, the theoretical debates among Latin American developmentalists and their political impact during the 20th century, and the contemporary post-development debates.

LLS 300 Special Topics: Latinx Immigration: Culture, Politics, Experience

Instructors: Dr. Theresa Torres & Dr. Deborah Cohen (UMSL)

Online course: Second 8-week session

This 8-week online course will help you answer some of the questions raised in today’s popular media discourse. It explores historically why Latinxs were present in the United States, why they immigrated, the places they immigrated from, and how this immigration and Latinxs as a group continue to shape the character of the United States, from food to music, language to politics. The course uses readings and films to explore Latinxs’ experiences, the different legal, social, and political constraints they faced, and how they impacted the America of today.

LLS 300-0002/ SOC 322 Race and Ethnic Relations

Instructor: Dr. Theresa Torres

Online course: Second 8-week session

This course is the study of the nature, origin, and dynamics of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and other societies. Specific attention will be given to the historical and contemporary contexts of prejudice, discrimination, and confrontation. The course covers history, biographies, family and community relations, social institutions, the impact of privilege, and new perspectives within society.

LLS 400-0002 Special Topics: Urban Latin America

Instructor: Dr. Clara Irazábal- Zurita

MW 1:00 to 2:15 pm

This course introduces the main urban characteristics of cities in Latin America and analyze their social, political, cultural and economic contexts. It examines a variety of subjects including housing, community development, transportation, citizen participation, urban design, and public space at a range of scales and configurations: buildings, neighborhoods, cities, metropolitan areas, and regions.

Spring 2018 LLAS Courses

LLS 201 Introduction to Latinx and Latin American Studies

Instructor: Dr. Joseph Hartman

MWF 10:00 to 10:50 am

This course addresses and examines the social, economic, and political factors that have influenced the historical experiences of Latinxs in the U.S. Attention will focus on the major concepts, issues and debates in the field of Latinx and Latin American Studies. Particular consideration will be given to an analysis of and understanding as to how these factors have influenced the past and present status of Latinxs in U.S. society. Examples of the types of topics to be discussed include affirmative action, art, English-only policies, identity, immigration, music, racism, politics, sexism and stereotyping, art. Other topics discussed will be based on student interest.

ANCHOR 211 Cities of the World

Instructors: Clara Irazábal-Zurita & Kim Sunyop

Tue/Thu 10:00 to 11:15 am

Urbanization has been a global phenomenon, and more than half of the world population lives in urban areas. Students will learn past, present and future urban issues and challenges on the global scale and about how cities of the world have coped with these issues and challenges.

LLS 322/ SOC 322 Race and Ethnic Relations

Instructor: Dr. Theresa Torres

Online course: First 8-week session

This course is the study of the nature, origin, and dynamics of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and other societies. Specific attention will be given to the historical and contemporary contexts of prejudice, discrimination, and confrontation. The course covers the following themes: history, biographies, family and community relations, social institutions, the impact of privilege, and new perspectives within society.

LLS 348/ SOC 348 Latinx Immigrants & Migrants in the U.S.

Instructor: Dr. Theresa Torres

Online course: Last 8-week session

We will study Latina/o immigrants in the US and particularly in Kansas City through films, speakers, and activities in the community to understand their place in the Kansas City. The course readings and topics are current and relevant to current issues on immigration. The class is an elective course for Urban Studies.

LLS 400/ ART-HIST 495 Special Topics: Made in the USA: Latinx Art and Experience

Instructor: Dr. Joseph Hartman

Mondays 1 to 3:30 pm

Latinx art is American art. Contextualized in light of demographic shifts, the popularity of Latinx culture (Pixar’s Coco, Despacito, Jane the Virgin), and continuing debates on immigration, civil rights, and national security: This course discusses how Latinx art is central to our understanding of the history of art in the United States. We will engage various debates: the politics of representation, gender, sexuality, race, class, and ethnicity in visual culture, Latinx art and the mainstream, how visibility informs political oppression as well as dissent, and how visualizations dealing with Latinidad affirm the culture of people of Latin American descent in the U.S.

LLS 400-0001 Special Topics: Introduction to Mexican Identity

Instructor: Dr. Matthew Edwards

 

LLS 400-0002 Special Topics: Contemporary Latin American Novels

Instructor: Alice Reckley

 

LLS 400-0003 Special Topics: Oral History/ Stories of Latinx KC

Instructor: Dr. Sandra Enriquez

 

LLS 405 RH/ HISTORY 405 RH: Colonial Latin America (From the Encounter to the Early 19th Century)

Instructor: Dr. Viviana Grieco

Tue/Thu 11:30 to 12:45 pm

This course discusses the conquest and colonization of Latin America by the Spanish and Portuguese imperial powers from the time of the encounter to the early nineteenth century. It studies the llerian, Indigenous, and African cultures and their influence in the creation of a colonial system sustained by not only economic power, but also religious, racial, and gendered hierarchies. Emphasis is given to the impact of the conquest, the economics of exploitation, race and gender identities and relations, religious and political dominations and the social dynamics of cities and countryside. This class counts as a History Department Non-Western program elective.

LLS 497-0001 Directed Research: Independent Study

Instructor: Dr. Clara Irazábal-Zurita

Students will develop and conduct a research project in an area selected by the student under the supervision of Dr. Irazabal-Zurita.

HISTORY 404 Women and Gender in Latin America

Instructor: Dr. Viviana Grieco

Online course

This course discusses gender in Latin America from the eve of conquest by the Portuguese and Spanish in the fifteenth century to the present. It is not solely about women in Latin America’s history as we will also examine how ideas about gender – the social and cultural attributes that were and are ascribed to individuals on the basis of their biological sex or sexual behavior – affected the lives of Latin American men and women. This course additionally analyzes how gender and race contributed to the creation of a hierarchical order during the colonial experience and afterwards. Finally, it explores the exercise of authority within and outside households and its impact on private and public spaces.