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Faculty Grants

Dr. Clara Irazábal-Zurita

Urban Community Development: A Gendered Community Capitals Framework Assessment

This is a research project that analyzes the relationship between the accumulation of communal assets and community development within the Latinx population of Wyandotte County, Kansas by adopting a Gendered Community Capitals Framework (GCCF). This framework considers natural, cultural, human, social, political, financial, and built assets (capitals). We will study the gendered nature of the accumulation or dis-accumulation of assets and the process of urban community development in Kansas City-Wyandotte County. This project is funded by a UMRB Grant. Dr. Irazábal-Zurita is the PI and Dr. Torres is the Co-PI.

Dr. Theresa Torres

NEH Arts Our Town Grant with El Centro

This grant is a second-round application in collaboration with El Centro, Kansas City, KS and local arts community. The grant will be a collaborative project with local arts communities in the Kansas City, KS community to develop arts an urban community utilizing the diversity of the local community.

Guadalupe Centers Research Project

This ongoing project is a collaborative effort with Guadalupe Centers Inc. (GCI) staff and UMKC students (who help with conducting interviews) and myself. We are developing a series of interviews both audio and video of community leaders and their connection with the center. The purpose of this research is to add to the limited research on GCI from the 1940s to the present day. The goal is to have this project completed by 2019, in time for the 100th anniversary of GCI.

Dr. Joseph Hartman

Research Fellowship at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History of the University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX (2016-2017)

Joseph R. Hartman was recently awarded a pre/postdoctoral research fellowship at the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History (EODIAH). Hartman worked in collaboration with other scholars at EODIAH, focusing on the global history of art and its relationship with the history of science and technology. Hartman received funding to finish his dissertation and then refine his PhD research into a book manuscript The Dictator’s Dreamscape: Building Machado’s Cuba.