MENU

UMKC-FBI Student Academy Classes

FBI AcademyUMKC students are learning about the FBI through a unique program called the UMKC Student Academy.

Students of all majors can attend the non-credit professional development academy at no charge. It consists of eight seminars led by FBI personnel. Students are encouraged to participate in as many sessions as possible and may pick and choose which sessions to attend. Those who attend six or more sessions will receive a certificate of participation from the FBI. Continue reading

4th Floor Cherry Hall (CJC and Philosophy)

photo by: University CommunicationsFourth Floor Cherry Hall Now Open For Business

Honors College, Criminal Justice, Philosophy Host Grand Opening of New Space

UMKC faculty, staff and students filed into Cherry Hall Nov. 2 and headed toward the fourth floor, not sure what to expect.

Upon arrival, they found a beautifully renovated, wide-open new space that had been vacant for nearly seven years. The top floor of the former dormitory, constructed in 1955, is now home to the Honors College, the Department of Philosophy and the department of Criminal Justice and Criminology. Continue reading

Denmark doesn’t treat its prisoners like prisoners…

Prisoners prepare their own meals, wear their own clothes and leave each day. It’s led to lower recidivism.

The most interesting thing about Scandinavian prisons? Many are barely prisons at all.

Our research team spent six weeks conducting intensive research in Danish prisons. We were struck by the sight of prisoners wearing their own clothes, cooking their own meals and having private family visits as often as once a week. At these “open” prisons, there are no barbed wire fences, solid walls with gun towers or secure perimeters.

Continue reading

The New Yorker’s “The Case Against Cash Bail”

Photo by: Spencer Platt / Getty
It’s obvious that jail isn’t good for the jailed. It may be particularly bad for people accused of minor crimes, who are confined not because they are likely to be dangerous but because, under our cash-bail system, they can’t afford to get out. Think of the appalling case of Kalief Browder, the Bronx teenager who was profiled by my colleague Jennifer Gonnerman, in 2014. He was charged with stealing a backpack and spent three years at Rikers Island awaiting trial. Two years after the trial was dismissed and he was released, Browder killed himself.

Continue reading

Missouri Reports Wide Racial Disparity in Traffic Stops

The New York Times’ John Eligon interviews CJC’s Ken Novak.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Police officers in Missouri were 75 percent more likely to stop black drivers than white drivers last year, and 73 percent more likely to search black drivers, according to a report released Monday by Chris Koster, the state’s attorney general.

The data also showed that although blacks were more likely to be stopped and searched than whites, they were less likely to be found with contraband than whites, the report said. Continue reading

KC anti-violence campaign aims to plug hole by looking at parolees

KC-NoVA image by Allison Long

The Kansas City No Violence Alliance recently started meeting with inmates about to go on parole in an effort to help them get what they need in order to keep them away from crime while also delivering them a warning. KC NoVa rounded up people deemed by police as being key to violent crime in the area in January 2013. File photo by ALLISON LONG The Kansas City Star . The conversations go like this:

An inmate nearing the end of his or her prison sentence is called to a meeting. A Kansas City police detective, a parole officer and an advocate for the inmate pull up chairs. Continue reading

Unified front is needed to steer area youths from violent crimes

Kansas City police have identified almost 200 young people who are connected to groups associated with crimes such as shootings, armed assaults, robberies and weapons trafficking. About half of the teenagers are 16 and younger, and a few are as young as 13.

Young suspects have been charged in two of the Kansas City region’s most violent and high-profile crimes so far this year.

The four men accused of killing Shawnee gun shop owner Jon Bieker Jan. 9 in a robbery gone bad range in age from 18 to 20. Continue reading

Police are crunching data to stop murders before they happen

Kansas City’s smart policing push users computers to find likely criminals and their associates. Civil rights groups say that tactic raises serious privacy questions.

Kansas City had a murder problem. For the past decade it’s violent crime rate had made it one of the top ten dangerous cities in America.

Read the full Fortune article.

Using Research to Reduce Violent Crime

Direct involvement by UMKC faculty aids No-Violence Alliance

An ongoing law enforcement effort to rethink strategies to reduce violent crime in the Kansas City area has its own secret weapon: UMKC.

The University of Missouri-Kansas City’s Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, part of the university’s College of Arts and Sciences, is intimately involved in the Kansas City No Violence Alliance (NoVA). NoVA is a 2-year-old multi-agency effort to reduce gun-related violence.

Chancellor Leo E. Morton serves on NoVA’s governing board, and UMKC faculty members and graduate students are embedded in NoVA’s effort to implement a crime-prevention approach known as “focused deterrence,” which helps police look beyond individual criminals to the criminals’ entire social networks.

Read the UMKC Today article.