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UMKC-FBI Student Academy Classes

FBI AcademyUMKC students are learning about the FBI through a unique program called the UMKC Student Academy.

Students of all majors can attend the non-credit professional development academy at no charge. It consists of eight seminars led by FBI personnel. Students are encouraged to participate in as many sessions as possible and may pick and choose which sessions to attend. Those who attend six or more sessions will receive a certificate of participation from the FBI. Continue reading

Missouri Reports Wide Racial Disparity in Traffic Stops

The New York Times’ John Eligon interviews CJC’s Ken Novak.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Police officers in Missouri were 75 percent more likely to stop black drivers than white drivers last year, and 73 percent more likely to search black drivers, according to a report released Monday by Chris Koster, the state’s attorney general.

The data also showed that although blacks were more likely to be stopped and searched than whites, they were less likely to be found with contraband than whites, the report said. Continue reading

Police are crunching data to stop murders before they happen

Kansas City’s smart policing push users computers to find likely criminals and their associates. Civil rights groups say that tactic raises serious privacy questions.

Kansas City had a murder problem. For the past decade it’s violent crime rate had made it one of the top ten dangerous cities in America.

Read the full Fortune article.

Using Research to Reduce Violent Crime

Direct involvement by UMKC faculty aids No-Violence Alliance

An ongoing law enforcement effort to rethink strategies to reduce violent crime in the Kansas City area has its own secret weapon: UMKC.

The University of Missouri-Kansas City’s Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, part of the university’s College of Arts and Sciences, is intimately involved in the Kansas City No Violence Alliance (NoVA). NoVA is a 2-year-old multi-agency effort to reduce gun-related violence.

Chancellor Leo E. Morton serves on NoVA’s governing board, and UMKC faculty members and graduate students are embedded in NoVA’s effort to implement a crime-prevention approach known as “focused deterrence,” which helps police look beyond individual criminals to the criminals’ entire social networks.

Read the UMKC Today article.