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Mission Statement

The missions of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at UMKC are to promote the importance of mathematics and statistics, to train future workers, and to advance the existing knowledge and application of mathematics and statistics. The department supports these missions through high-quality instruction in a comprehensive suite of undergraduate and graduate courses in mathematics and statistics and through interdisciplinary activities, including a high level of collaborative research activity in the life and health sciences, the STEM fields, finance, and economics.

Students

Our students at UMKC receive cutting-edge research opportunities with expert faculty, exposure to theory, and numerous connections to career opportunities within Kansas City, the country and abroad. Meet our students

Faculty

Our faculty carry out research in both the traditional disciplines of mathematics and statistics as well as interdisciplinary and applied mathematics. The research topics in traditional disciplines include commutative algebra, set theory, differential equations, and statistical analysis. The topics in applied mathematics include scientific computing, disease modeling, numerical analysis, and financial mathematics. Learn more about faculty research

Applied Mathematics Group

The UMKC Applied Mathematics Group is a research group within the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at University of Missouri-Kansas City. The applied mathematics group has interdisciplinary research interests in the areas of mathematical biology, scientific computations, applied analysis, and numerical linear algebra. See the Applied Mathematics Group Activities.

Undergraduate Programs

The department  provides an education that prepares students to excel in many professional or academic arena related to mathematics and statistics. The department offers coursework leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics, the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, Double Degree/Major in Mathematics and related fields, and Mathematics Minor.

Graduate Programs

The department offers coursework leading to the Master of Science in Mathematics, and the Master of Science in Statistics. The department also participates in the UMKC School of Graduate Studies Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program with emphasis in Mathematics or Statistics.

Archives:  Departmental History

Our department was founded in 1933 as the Department of Mathematics at Kansas City University.  We have a trove of biographical profiles, lists, and trivia about our predecessors—faculty and students. Learn more about our departmental history

UMKC Applied Mathematics Group

The UMKC Applied Mathematics Group is a research group within the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at University of Missouri-Kansas City. The applied mathematics group has interdisciplinary research interests in the areas of mathematical biology, scientific computations, applied analysis, and numerical linear algebra. It also provides high quality teaching and professional service to community such as mathematical modeling, big data analysis and numerical computations.

Faculty Research Areas

Dr. Rhee’s research area is in numerical linear algebra, including stable and efficient computations of eigenvalues, eigenvectors, singular values, and singular vectors of matrices. In recent years he has been dealing with the following applied linear algebra problems: approximations of the stationary densities of Frobenius-Perron operators; maximum entropy method and its applications; matrix equations – especially Yang-Baxter matrix equation.

Dr. Bani-Yaghoub uses partial, delay and ordinary differential equations in modeling and analysis of infectious diseases and population dynamics. He welcomes interdisciplinary projects leading to grant proposals or peer-reviewed publications. His research includes but not limited to nonlinear analysis of delayed reaction–diffusion equations, numerical simulation of traveling and stationary wave solutions arising in mathematical biology, and deterministic modeling and analysis host-pathogen systems.

Dr. Li has developed the theoretical conditions for triangular meshes such that the numerical approximations for anisotropic diffusion problems are free of non-physical solutions. His current research focuses on parallel computing and mesh adaptation for three-dimensional anisotropic diffusion problems and their applications. His research interests include numerical solutions for partial differential equations, finite element method, anisotropic mesh adaptation, anisotropic diffusion problems, image processing, and mathematical modeling and simulation in engineering.

Current Projects and Activities:

1. Data analysis and statistical modeling (Children’s Mercy Hospital)

2. Impacts of Cattle Movements of Spread of Disease (UC Davis)

Current activities of UMKC Applied Mathematics group include

(1) organizing Math & Stats Research Day (MSRD),
(2) providing Applied Mathematics Public Lecture Series (AMPLE), and
(3) professional service to the community.

Past Projects:

1. Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program (IAMP)

2. Predicting the Next Life Event (H&R Block)

3. Numerical Computations in Image Processing (KU Med)

Collaborative Opportunities

UMKC Applied Mathematics Group is looking for motivated students and scholars in applied mathematics and related fields. Several projects are available throughout the year. In addition to UMKC SEARCH, SUROP and SGS Research funding resources, limited funding is available through the faculty members.

Desired qualifications:

(1) knowledge of calculus, ordinary differential equation, matrix theory and linear algebra
(2) quantitative, analytical and programming skills (preferably MATLAB, R, or Python)
(3) background and/or interest in applied mathematics
(4) ability to communicate effectively in spoken and written English.

If you are interested, please submit a cover letter, your CV, and the names of 3 references via e-mail to Dr. Bani-Yaghoub baniyaghoubm@umkc.edu. In your cover letter please indicate the name of the faculty member that you are interested to work with.

Applied Mathematics Group Activities

In addition to several interdisciplinary research projects, the current activities of UMKC Applied Mathematics Group include

(1) organizing Math & Stats Research Day (MSRD),
(2) providing Applied Mathematics Public Lecture Series (AMPLE), and
(3) professional service to the community.

Details of each activity are given below.

1. UMKC Math & Stats Research Day (MSRD)

The MSRD is an annual one day conference organized by the faculty members of the Applied Mathematics Group. It provides a platform for students and faculty to publicly present their research and scholarly activities in mathematics, statistics, and their applications in various fields. This event is open to all students (undergraduate and graduate), faculty, and staff. In a broad context, interdisciplinary studies with some applications of mathematical or statistical methods would be suitable to present in the UMKC Math & Stats Research Day.

Fifth Annual MSRD (2019)

Archive of MSRD

2018 UMKC Math & Stats Research Day
2017 UMKC Math & Stats Research Day
2016 UMKC Math & Stats Research Day
2015 UMKC Math & Stats Research Day

2. Applied Mathematics Public Lecture Series (AMPLE)

The Applied Mathematics Lecture Series is an effort to provide high quality lectures in applied mathematics. The lecture series  started in Spring 2016. For more information contact Dr. Noah Rhee (RheeN@umkc.edu).

 

Fall 2019 Schedule

  • 10/7/2019  Dr. Stephen Ziliak, The Significance of Statistical Insignificance, Roosevelt University

YouTube Videos: Part 1Part 2

  • 9/13/2019 Dr. John Spertus, Health Outcomes Research, Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute
  • 8/30/2019 Dr. Majid Bani-Yaghoub, Data Analytics & Actuarial Science, UMKC Math & Stat Department

 

 

Archive of AMPLE

Spring 2019 Schedule

      • 03/15/2019 Jessie Bleile, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)
      • 03/22/2019 Justin Munyakazi, University of Western Cape, South Africa
      • 04/05/2019 Xing Xia UMKC Math & Stat

Fall 2018 Schedule

      • 09/21/2018 Dr. Majid Bani Yaghoub, A gentle introduction to stochastic and deterministic infections disease models: theory, applications and computing
      • 10/05/2018 Dr. Akim Adekpedjou, Statistical Models in Actuarial Science: Applications and Importance in Our Daily Life
      • 10/12/2018 Dr. Xianping Li, Anisotropic Mesh Adaptation in Numerical Computations with Applications
      • 10/19/2018 Dr. Noah Rhee, Least Squares Method of approximating the Invariant Density of the Frobenius-Perron Operator

Spring 2018 Schedule

      • 02/02/2018 Dr. Majid Bani Yaghoub, A gentle introduction to theory and applications of nonlinear waves
      • 03/02/2018 Dr. Majid Bani Yaghoub, Theory and applications of nonlinear waves: Ecology of invasive species
      • 03/16/2018 Dr. Noah Rhee, Convergence and the Rate of Asymptotic Convergence of Jacobi Method
      • 04/13/2018 Dr. Justine Shults (University of Pennsylvania), Likelihood Based Analysis of Longitudinal Discrete Data with Over-dispersion

Fall 2017 Schedule

      • 10/27/2017 Dr. Xianping Li, Mesh Adaptation for Anisotropic Porous Medium Equations
      • 11/03/2017 Dr. Noah Rhee, Jacobi method for symmetric eigenvalue problem
      • 12/01/2017 Dr. Majid Bani Yaghoub, Using mathematics to characterize waves of invasive species

YouTube Applied Math Channel 

3. Professional Service to Community

The Applied Mathematics Group welcomes research and industrial collaborations with companies, business and corporations. We offer the following services several companies in  Kansas City metropolitan area.

a) Training and Consultation
b) Mathematical and Experimental Modeling
c) Big Data Analysis and Numerical Computations

For more information please contact Dr. Majid Bani-Yaghoub (baniyaghoubm@umkc.edu).

Applied Mathematics Group 

Graduate Admission and Application

General Application Information

  • It is highly recommended that you contact us, before applying for a graduate degree. For PhD in Mathematics or Statistics, please contact the Interdisciplinary PhD Coordinator. For MS in Mathematics or Statistics, please contact the Principal Graduate Advisor. Check the Academic Advising page for details of contact.
  • For applicants to one of the graduate programs who aim to enter the program in either the Summer or Fall semester, the priority deadline is March 15.
  • For applicants to one of the graduate programs who aim to enter the program in the Spring semester, the priority deadline is October 15.

Admission requirements for the M.S. Programs

(in either Mathematics or Statistics)

  • The applicant must meet the minimum requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies. This information may be found under the Prospective Students tab on the School of Graduate Studies website.
  • Applicants need to hold a bachelors’ degree from an accredited college or university, with a satisfactory GPA.
  •  If the applicant’s degree is not in Mathematics or Statistics (or equivalent), then the applicant must have taken Calculus I, II, and III and at least three other Mathematics or Statistics classes beyond Calculus III, with satisfactory grades.
  •  International applicants need to satisfy the requirements of the International Students Affairs Office, including those on TOEFL or IELTS scores.

Materials to be submitted for the M.S. Program

(in either Mathematics or Statistics)

  1.  A complete application for the M.S. program consists of, at a minimum,
    • A set of official transcripts from the applicant’s undergraduate university.
    • A one-page statement detailing the applicant’s educational plans.
    • International students need to submit official TOEFL or IELTS scores, unless exempt, and satisfy the requirements set forward by the International Students Affairs Office. 
  2. The applicant may also send the following optional materials:
    • Three letters of reference to be sent directly to the Principal Graduate Advisor Dr. Sega segal@umkc.edu.
    • A valid GRE score, if available.

 Application materials are to be submitted with the General UMKC Application 

Admission requirements for the Ph.D. Program

(in either Mathematics or Statistics)

In order to gain admission to the  interdisciplinary Ph.D. program with Mathematics as the coordinating discipline, the applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Minimum requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies. This information may be found under the Prospective Students tab on the School of Graduate Studies website.
  2. At least a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics, Statistics, or related field from an accredited college or university. A bachelor’s degree in another subject will suffice, provided that the applicant has successfully completed at least three Mathematics courses beyond Calculus I, II, and III.
  3. An overall grade-point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale during the Bachelor’s program, or an overall GPA of at least 3.0 on all post-Bachelor’s work.
  4. Be recommended for admission by the doctoral faculty review groups in both Mathematics and the co-discipline.
  5. One can find a list of possible co-disciplines on the iPh.D. Studies at UMKC page.

Materials to be submitted for the iPh.D. Program

  1. A complete application consists of the following materials:
    1. A set of all official transcripts from work completed at colleges and/or universities
    2. A one-page statement detailing the student’s educational plans
    3. A valid GRE score
    4. Three letters of reference
    5. International applicants must submit documentation of their Test of English as a Foreign Language score if they have studied less than two years full time in a U.S. academic program or a comparable program in an English-speaking country. The applicant must have attained a score of at least 550 on the paper-based test, 213 on the computer-based test, or 80 on the internet-based test.
  2. Application Materials are to be submitted to the General UMKC  Application

Applying for a Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) Position

  1. The applicant must first apply for admission to the M.S. or iPh.D. program.
  2. The primary GTA application deadline for applicants wishing to begin in the Fall semester is February 15 for both international and domestic applications.
  3. The primary GTA application deadline for applicants wishing to begin in the Spring semester is October 1 for both international and domestic applications.
  4. The applicant must submit the following materials:
    1. A departmental GTA Application Form.
    2. Three letters of recommendation. Please give a copy of the Evaluation of Fitness for Graduate Studies to all those writing recommendations and have them attach it to their letters.
  5. Please send your GTA application along with your M.S. or iPh.D. application to the same address. In addition, please send a copy of the GTA application to the Department Principal Graduate Advisor:
    Graduate Advisor
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics
    Haag Hall, Room 206
    University of Missouri—Kansas City
    5100 Rockhill Road
    Kansas City, MO 64110, USA
    Phone: (816) 235-1641
  6. Duties of the GTA
    1. Must be seeking a graduate degree in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.
    2. Work 20 hours per week during the semester through some combination of teaching and tutoring.
    3. Enroll in a minimum of 6 hours of mathematics or statistics courses for graduate credit each semester.
    4. Further information:
      1. GTA appointment pays a monthly stipend.
      2. GTA appointment pays in-state educational fees for the first 6 credit hours of the Fall and Spring semesters.
      3. Out-of-State fee status is waived for students who are not Missouri residents.

Become a Student

Shelby Bell graduated in May 2018 with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Statistics. She will start her masters program in Biostatistics at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Fall 2018.
Students in our department receive academic and career advising tailored to their individual needs.

Most of our courses have a small student to faculty ratio, allowing for more one-on-one interaction between faculty and students and an enhanced learning environment.

Both graduate and undergraduate students get the opportunity to work with faculty who are known on the national and international level.

CAS Dean’s Fall Reception presents Faculty and Staff Awards

The College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to announce one staff award and four sets of faculty awards that were presented at the annual CAS Dean’s Fall Reception on September 11.

Faculty Awards are as follows:

Dean’s Outstanding Teaching Award (awarded to a tenure-track or tenured faculty member)

Royall Distinguished Professors (honors faculty committed to research excellence, creativity, and interdisciplinarity, as well as pedagogy)

Bernardin Research Development Grant (recipients are granted support to prepare a grant proposal in their chosen area of research)

Haskell Distinguished Research Award (recipients receive an award to support the completion of a scholarly project or creative work)

Staff Award is as follows:

Outstanding Staff Member

(awarded to recognize outstanding contributions made by staff members who are employed by the College of Arts & Sciences with strong characteristics including: respectful, responsible, resourceful, receptive, responsive, and reasonable)

Colloquium Series

The 2019 Fall colloquia are held according to the posted schedule. The Colloquium Series are open to public and the graduate students are highly recommended to attend.

Organizer: Dr. Said Shehab .

Fall 2019 Schedule

Time: 3:00-4:00 PM

Location: Haag Hall Room 201A

Date Speaker Organization
8/30/2019 Majid Bani-Yaghoub UMKC Math & Stat Department
9/6/2019 Richard Delaware UMKC Math & Stat Department
9/13/2019 John Spertus Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute
9/20/2019 Sam Ye University of Missouri-Kansas City
9/27/2019 James Foran UMKC Math & Stat Department
7/10/2019 Stephen Ziliak Roosevelt University
10/11/2019 Rylan Sampson UMKC Math & Stat Department
10/25/2019 Nasir Zarzour UMKC Math & Stat Department
 11/8/2019 Bill Shillito Emporia State University
11/15/2019 David Spade University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
11/15/2019 Jiu Ding University of Southern Mississippi

Computational Approach to Bounding the Mixing Time of a Metropolis-Hastings Sampler

Friday, Nov. 15 , 2019
2:00-3:00PM, Haag Hall 201
David Spade
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are commonly used to obtain approximate samples from intractable probability distributions. Any time an MCMC algorithm is used, it is important to be able to obtain a sense of how long the underlying Markov chain takes to get close to its stationary distribution. While several theory-based approaches to obtaining such information exist in the literature, many of them are difficult to use in practice. As an alternative, the literature is rich with techniques for assessing convergence based on the output of the chain. These techniques suffer from their own limitations, so this work presents a computational approach to estimating an upper bound on the mixing time of the chain based on auxiliary simulations. Specifically, this work estimates the drift and minorization coefficients for random-walk Metropolis algorithms that explore R^m, and it provides a description of how the methods contained herein may be applied to other settings.

Chaos from Statistical Viewpoint

Friday, Nov. 15 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 201
Jiu Ding
University of Southern Mississippi

The ergodic theory of chaotic map plays an important role in science and technology such as computational molecular dynamics and wireless communications. In this talk we look at chaos from the statistical point of view, and introduce Frobenius-Perron operators. The classic Ulam’s method and its modern extension will be presented too.

Off Limits: Lifting the Ban on Infinitesimals and Division by Zero

Friday, Nov. 8 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 201
Bill Shillito 
Emporia State University

Audience: Anyone who is interested in mathematics and especially the idea of infinity. Some familiarity with basic calculus is recommended, but not strictly required.

Abstract: Infinity is a beautiful concept in mathematics, but it often has somewhat of a taboo status, dismissed as unrigorous. This talk focuses on a couple of ways to break that taboo by introducing alternatives to the real number system. First we will explore the hyperreal numbers, a number system that includes infinitesimal and infinite quantities. We will then see how we can actually divide by zero (!) and the applications and consequences that arise from doing so.

 

Sequential Sampling Procedures for Software Reliability Estimation

Friday, October 28 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 201
Nasir Zarzour
UMKC

Abstract: Reliability is the probability that the software will give the correct result for a single randomly chosen use. We will develop a model based on a system with k components. Each Component has an unknown reliability. Our goal is to estimate the reliability of the system. Presented here is a Bayesian approach to test case allocation in the software reliability estimation. Bayesian analysis allows us to update our beliefs about the reliability of a particular partition as we test, and thus, refine our allocation of test case during the reliability testing process. A cost actor will be included in our model for estimating the reliability of the system. A comparison between the proposed design and the best fixed design theoretically and numerically will be included.

 

 

Constructible Numbers, Squaring the Circle, and The Indiana Pi Bill: The Time Pi Almost Legally Became 3.2

Friday, Oct. 11 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 201
Rylan Sampson
University of Missouri-Kansas City

Audience: This talk is intended to be both informative and entertaining, and it is open to the general public. Though we will be using specific results from abstract algebra, geometry, and complex analysis, an understanding of only college algebra is sufficient to enjoy this topic.

Abstract: The Indiana Pi Bill was a proposed state law in 1897 that falsely suggested a method to “square the circle,” an impossible feat that puzzled geometers since antiquity. In this talk, we will discuss why squaring the circle is impossible, by way of introducing constructible numbers (distances between points that can be obtained using a compass and straightedge) and transcendental numbers (numbers that cannot be the solution to any polynomial equation with integer coefficients). The payoff for this discussion is the understanding of the details in the true story about how the mathematical constant pi (π = 3.14159…) was almost redefined to 3.2 via legislative fiat.

 

CHARACTERIZING THE COORDINATE FUNCTIONS OF SPACE FILLING CURVES

Friday, Sep 27 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 201
James Foran
University of Missouri-Kansas City

Coordinate functions of space filling curves are continuous functions from [0,1] to [0,1] so that F(t) = ((g(t),f(t)) maps [0,1] onto [0,1]2. Some history and properties of such functions will be presented along with the speaker’s recent result with Judit Kardos that gives necessary and sufficient conditions on a function g(t) for there to be such an f(t). It will be shown how to construct an f(t) given a g(t) that satisfies the condition.

 

Sequential Promotion and Detection of Latent Attribute Change in Cognitive Diagnosis Models.

Friday, Sep 20 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 201
Sam Ye
University of Missouri-Kansas City

Cognitive Diagnosis Models(CDMs) primarily aim to identify binary elements of multiple fine-grained attributes at subject-level. When multiple attributes are assessed simultaneously and are expected to change during a span of items, estimation of multiple change-points becomes a classical sequential detection problem. In this research, state-of-the-art statistics that detect latent changes such as CUSUM, Shiryaev and Shiryaev-Roberts are presented to be incorporated in the framework of CDMs. These methods indulge in optimality properties and they can be calibrated to yield a predetermined false detection rate. A Bayesian item selection method that stimulates latent change that can be used in conjunction with the detection method is also introduced. Simulation results indicate that both sequential detection methods and the data-driven item selection method outperform the existing methods by reducing the delay in detection.

Spring 2019 Schedule

Date Speaker Organization
03/08 Jin Feng University of Kansas
02/01 Rylan Sampson UMKC Math & Stat
02/08 Paul Cazeaux University of Kansas
03/15 Jessie Bleile National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)
03/22 Justin Munyakazi University of Western Cape, South Africa
04/05 Xing Xia UMKC Math & Stat
04/12 Jin Feng University of Kansas
04/26 Kyle Maddox University of Missouri-Columbia

 

Friday, April 26 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 312
Kyle Maddox
Department of Mathematics
University of Missouri-Columbia
Ideals in Prime Characteristic Rings

ABSTRACT
Every ring (commutative with unit) comes equipped with a natural map from the integers. When the kernel of this map is generated by a prime number, the ring has many interesting and deep properties. In this talk, I will define the characteristic of a ring and explore basic properties of the so-called Frobenius map, including how it acts on the set of ideals of the ring. Some basic abstract algebra (the definition of rings, ring maps, and ideals) will be assumed, but otherwise no prerequisites are necessary.

 

Friday, April 12 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 312
Jin Feng
Department of Mathematics
University of Kansas
A Hamilton-Jacobi Theory for Derivations of Hydrodynamic Fluctuations on Nonlinear Heat

ABSTRACT
We outline a Hamilton-Jacobi theory for deriving fluctuation structure of a nonlinear heat equation in hydrodynamic limit. A two scale particle model known as the Carleman model is used to illustrate the ideas. One can view this as an infinite particle version of the known weak KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) theory.

 

Friday, April 5 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 312
Xing Xia
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Second-Order Efficiency of Bayes Risk for Estimating Product of 2 Means in Exponential Family

ABSTRACT
Increasing availability of powerful hardware and increasing usability of software have resulted in a world that relies on technology. Powerful and accurate software have led to successes in the medical, industrial, military, academic, and other fields. Inaccurate software, however, can be ruinous or dangerous when that software is used in a safety critical system. Our reliance on software for important outcomes makes it incredibly important to estimate its reliability. We want to estimate reliability of sequential designed procedures with minimum errors, which can help improving software reliability testing as an application. The second-order lower bound of Bayes risk is derived to achieve this goal. In particular, this talk will present the second-order efficiency of the product of two means of independent populations in the Bayesian framework. The trials of samplings are from the one-parameter exponential family, which generalize the result to wider practical applications. We propose and test the derived result in two popular sampling designs: fully sequential sampling design and three-stage sampling design, by using Monte Carlo simulations. The trials of samplings are from Bernoulli distribution which is a demonstration of software reliability testing in application. The second-order efficiency is shown in both sampling schemes.

 

Friday, March 22 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 312
Justin Munyakazi
Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics
University of Western Cape, South Africa
A robust finite difference scheme for singularly perturbed systems

ABSTRACT
We present some qualitative properties of the solution to some singularly perturbed systems of differential equations and its derivatives. Then we propose a finite difference method to solve such systems efficiently. Through an error analysis, we prove that the method is uniformly convergent with respect to the perturbation parameters. We implement the method on some test examples to confirm its robustness.

 

Friday, March 15 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 312
Jessie Bleile
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)
The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and its role in GPS

ABSTRACT
In this presentation, I will present a brief overview of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and its career and internship opportunities. I will then discuss my work as an Orbit Analyst and the role NGA plays in Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and specifically the U.S. operated Global Positioning System (GPS). Finally, I will give a talk on how GPS works.

 

Friday, February 8 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 312
Paul Cazeaux
Department of Mathematics
University of Kansas
Relaxation and moiré patterns of incommensurate 2D heterostructures

ABSTRACT
We discuss novel mathematical models for the analysis and computational prediction of mechanical relaxation of two-dimensional layered atomic crystals in the presence of large-scale moiré patterns. The concept of configuration space or hull, previously introduced for the study of transport properties in aperiodic materials by Bellissard et al., is shown to allow for a unified description of continuum as well as atomistic models of elastic relaxation for a wide range of materials in the truly incommensurate (aperiodic) regime.

In the case of twisted bilayers with identical materials, we will present some preliminary analysis and numerical results in the asymptotic regime of small twist angle (inducing a large-scale moiré pattern) and small interlayer Van der Waals forces, in particular the well-known case of graphene/graphene but also MoS2/MoS2.

 

Friday, February 1 , 2019
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 312
Rylan Sampson
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Factorization of triangular matrices over information algebras

ABSTRACT
Given an information algebra, i.e., an antinegative semiring without zero-divisors, we explore factorization in the semiring of upper-triangular matrices with entries in the information algebra. We provide a classification of the atoms of this semiring in terms of both the additive and multiplicative structure of the underlying information algebra. We conclude with results on the maximum and minimum factorization lengths of such matrices, as well as other factorization-theoretic invariants.

 


Colloquium Archives

2006      2007      2008      2009      2010

2011        2012      2013       2014       2015

2016       2017       2018

Colloquium-2018

Fall 2018

Date Speaker Organization
09/21 Majid Bani-Yaghoub AMG, UMKC Math & Stat
09/27 Shuguang Wang University of Missouri
10/05 Akim Adekpedjou Missouri Science & Technology
10/12 Xianping Li AMG, UMKC Math & Stat
10/19 Noah Rhee AMG, UMKC Math & Stat
10/26 Nadeesha Mawella UMKC Math & Stat
11/02 Zongwu Cai University of Kansas
11/16 Yufei Yu University of Kansas
11/30 Avary Kolasinski University of Kansas

 

Friday, November 30 , 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Avary Kolasinski
Department of Mathematics
University of Kansas
A New Theory for ​Movement of Surface Meshes

ABSTRACT

Adaptive mesh refinement has been proven to be an extremely useful tool in the numerical solutions of partial differential equations (PDEs). This is because when solutions are calculated numerically, they are often limited to a pre-determined mesh however, many problems do not require a uniform precision in the mesh. A more accurate solution may be obtained if specific regions of the mesh that require higher precision contain a higher concentration of mesh elements. Meshing functionals, and the theory within, can be used to adapt the mesh in this manner.

We will propose an approach for mesh adaptation on surfaces that, to our best knowledge, is the only surface moving mesh method that can be directly applied to a general surface. We will formulate a surface functional based on the equidistribution and alignment conditions and employ a new surface MMPDE method to find its minimizer. We will then discuss and prove various theoretical properties, including that the mesh stays nonsingular for all time if it is so initially. Finally, we will present various numerical results in two and three-dimensions.

Friday, November 16 , 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Yufei Yu
Department of Mathematics
University of Kansas
Effects of Permanent Charge and Boundary Condition on Ionic Flow via a Quasi-1D Poisson-Nernst-Planck Model

ABSTRACT

Ionic channels – large proteins on cell membrane – are a major way for ions to transport through cell membrane that carries electric signals for cells to communicate with each other. The permanent charge of an ion channel is the crucial structure for ionic flow properties of the channel. The effects of permanent charges interacting with boundary conditions have been studied analytically via the Quasi-1D Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model for small permanent charge and for large permanent charge. In this talk, we will present results of numerical investigation to bridge between the two extrema. As expected, our numerical results verify the analytical predictions for small and large permanent charges. On the other hand, non-trivial behavior emerges as one varies the permanent charge from small to large, in particular, bifurcations are revealed, showing the rich phenomena of permanent charge effects by the power of combining the analytical and numerical studies. An adaptive moving mesh finite element method has been applied which is critical due to the presence of Debye layers at the interface between the permanent charge regions and uncharged regions of ion channels. This talk is based on a joint work with W. Huang and W. Liu, both from KU.

Friday, November 2 , 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Zongwu Cai
Department of Economics
University of Kansas
Models on Testing Predictability of Asset Returns

ABSTRACT

Testing predictability of asset returns is a cornerstone issue in modern asset pricing and the related fields. It has been one of the hottest research topics in asset pricing field in the recent two decades. In this talk, I will combine several of my own papers (published papers and ongoing projects) on testing predictability of asset returns and review the recent developments in this area. In particular, I will outline some future research topics in this area.

Friday, October 26, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Nadeesha Mawella
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
A robust test of homogeneity in zero-inflated models for count data

ABSTRACT

Score statistics are often used for the test of homogeneity in zero-inflated models for count data. The most cited justification is that it only requires the model fit under the null hypothesis. However, the true null models are often unknown in practice and these statistics can be invalid when the null models are not correctly specified. An intensive simulation study revealed that the empirical sizes of these score tests for zero-inflated models might behave extremely liberal and unstable under misspecifications, particularly when the mean function of baseline distribution or the baseline distribution itself was misspecified.

In this talk, a new score test of homogeneity for zero-inflated models which is robust to these misspecifications is presented. Technically, the test is developed under the framework of Poisson-Gamma mixture model which can provide a more general framework to incorporate various baseline distributions without specifying the mean function. The empirical performances of the proposed test in finite samples are evaluated in simulation studies and the test is applied to the Girl Scout data from Scouting Nutrition and Activity Program (SNAP).

Friday, October 19, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Noah Rhee
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Least Squares Method of approximating the Invariant Density of the Frobenius-Perron Operator

ABSTRACT

Let S be a measurable function from [0,1] into itself. In ergodic theory, it is important to find a measure that is invariant under S, that is, the measure of the inverse image of any set A in the Borel sigma-algebra on [0,1] is the same as the measure of A. Such a measure can be constructed if the Frobenius-Perron operator associated with S has an invariant density function. In this talk we discuss a least squares method of approximating the invariant density function of the Frobenius-Perron operator associated with S from the spaces of continuous piecewise linear functions.

Friday, October 12, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Xianping Li
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Anisotropic Mesh Adaptation in Numerical Computations with Applications

ABSTRACT

Anisotropic mesh adaptation (AMA) has been successfully applied to improve computational efficiency and accuracy when solving differential equations. In some circumstances, unphysical solutions (artifacts) may occur if regular meshes are used in the computations. In this talk, I will present the M-uniform mesh approach and describe two different implementation methods for anisotropic mesh adaptation. One method uses mesh generators to construct the meshes according to the computed metric tensors. The other method is called the Moving Mesh PDE (MMPDE) method that moves the mesh nodes according to the minimization of an energy functional. Numerical results in different applications will be presented.

Friday, October 5, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Akim Adekpedjou
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Science and Technology
Statistical Models in Actuarial Science: Applications and Importance in Our Daily Life

ABSTRACT

This talk pertains to the understanding of what actuarial science is about, especially the importance of having an insurance policy. Since insurance policies covers for a sudden financial impact of a loss of something (property, relative, job etc..) important to us, the time and value of the unit at the time of the event (accident, death, loss of a job) can not be predicted, and are therefore totally random. In light of that, I will discuss basic statistical models for modeling uncertainty in insurance, and how those impact our daily life. The focus will be placed on property insurance, life insurance and annuities. A few real life example will be given. I will discuss a few things for those who want to pursue a career in actuarial science.

Thursday, September 27, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Royall Hall 205
Shuguang Wang
Department of Mathematics
University of Missouri
Real Algebraic Varieties

ABSTRACT

A real algebraic variety is the solution space of an equation f(x)=0, where f(x) is a homogeneous polynomial of real coefficients. Their study is among the oldest mathematical subjects and yet remains to be one of the least understood areas. The talk will begin with a brief history and a few illustrative classical results. We will then describe the current research on the topological and geometric aspects
that connect with Seiberg-Witten gauge theory as well as a probabilistic approach.

Friday, September 21, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Majid Bani-Yaghoub
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
A gentle introduction to stochastic and deterministic infections disease models: theory, applications and computing

ABSTRACT

In this lecture, I will present a few examples of the infectious disease models such as susceptible-infected-recovered and susceptible-infected-susceptible models. These models are formulated both with the stochastic and the deterministic systems of differential equations. Using the numerical simulations, the outcomes of the deterministic and the stochastic models will be compared, where the pros and cons of each model will be discussed.  Using the influenza data, I will illustrate how the parameter values of the models can be estimated.  The concept of the basic reproduction number will be introduced, where the methods of next generation matrix and survival function will be utilized to compute the basic reproduction number.

 


Spring 2018

Friday, April 27, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Jeffrey Thompson
Department of Biostatistics
University of Kansas Medical Center
Assessing Equivalent and Inverse Change in Genomic Data from Multiple Experiments: a New Approach to Functional Analysis

ABSTRACT

Many gene expression studies look at whether a treatment has similar or opposing effects compared to other treatments (e.g. the effect of a gene deletion vs. overexpression on other genes). Often, researchers seek to understand the impact of these treatments on biological functions by functional enrichment analysis (testing if disrupted genes are overrepresented in a biological pathway). Statistical methods specifically for equivalently or opposingly changed genes are lacking, so researchers often resort to simple comparisons of directionality of change across treatments/experiments. In this work, I introduce the Equivalent Change Index (ECI), which measures the degree of equivalent or inverse change across treatments or experiments, and propose statistical tests for equivalent change at the level of genes, pathways, and genome. Using simulated and biological data, I show the ECI and related tests are an effective means of detecting equivalent and inverse change in gene expression and demonstrate a novel method of analysis that can detect pathways enriched for genes in cases when typical GSEA cannot, allowing a focus on changes that are particularly relevant to certain questions.

Friday, April 13, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Justine Shults
Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics
University of Pennsylvania
Likelihood Based Analysis of Longitudinal Discrete Data with Over-dispersion

ABSTRACT

I consider longitudinal discrete data that may be unequally spaced in time and that may be over-dispersed, so that the variance is larger than anticipated for the assumed distribution. I describe some challenges we face when analyzing count data and in particular, some limitations to the popular generalized estimating equation approach (GEE) in this setting. I then present a likelihood based method that assumes first-order antedependence and linearity for the expectations of the conditional distributions for each subject. I demonstrate the method in an analysis of two studies with discrete outcomes and evaluate the performance of the method relative to GEE in simulations.

Friday, March 16, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Noah Rhee
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Convergence and the Rate of Asymptotic Convergence of Jacobi Method

ABSTRACT

This talk is a continuation of the talk given in Fall 2017, in which we discussed the basic angle formula of Jacob method for 2 x 2 symmetric matrices. In this talk we generalize Jacobi method to any n x n symmetric matrices, and discuss the issues of convergence and the rate of asymptotic convergence of Jacobi Method.

Friday, March 9, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
David Spade
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
A Bayesian Approach to Tree-Based Detection of Quantitative Trait Loci

ABSTRACT

In the literature, one can find a myriad of techniques for the analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). All of these methods have the same goal: to detect genetic markers that are significant to the expression of a particular trait. This work focuses on detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are significant to trait expression. The proposed method incorporates a covariance structure among the trait values through construction of a marginal phylogenetic tree at each SNP site. Significance is assessed via posterior mean trait value estimation and comparison with the posterior density at other sites via the posterior density ratio. This alleviates the need for permutation testing, upon with other techniques of GWAS analysis rely.

Friday, March 2, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Majid Bani-Yaghoub
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Theory and applications of nonlinear waves: Ecology of invasive species

ABSTRACT

This is the second talk related to the theory and applications of nonlinear waves. In the first talk, I covered the basics of wave theory and provided multiple examples arising in physics and biology. In this talk, I will focus on mathematical ecology of invasive species and introduce a reaction-diffusion model with delay and nonlocality. Then, I will discuss the methods for investigating the existence, uniqueness, and stability of traveling and stationary wave solutions. By simulation the wave solutions of the model, I will show that the traveling and stationary waves of the model can measure and predict the dynamics of invasive species.

Friday, February 23, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Akim Adekpedjou
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Science and Technology
Non Ignorable Missing Responses under Rank-Based Inference

ABSTRACT

Missing data have become almost inevitable whenever data are collected and this can occur either by design or out of control of the investigator. The missing mechanism can be: Missing at Random (MAR), Missing Completely at Random (MCAR), or Missing Not at Random (MNAR). Knowledge of the mechanism that led to missingness is crucial for analysis and interpretation. This talk pertains to the MNAR under a general regression setting. Many of the existing methods for estimating the model parameters lack robustness and/or efficiency. We first fill in the missing data via a technique called imputation. Two imputation approaches for filing in the missing data are presented. Next, based on the complete and imputed data, a fully nonparametric estimator of the likelihood of being missing is proposed. That is used to present a robust and efficient approach toward estimating the true regression parameters via a rank-based objective function when some responses in the regression model are MNAR. Asymptotic properties for the estimators are established. Monte Carlo simulation experiments are carried out and show that the proposed estimators are more efficient than the least squares estimator whenever the model error distribution is heavy tailed, contaminated and/or when data contain gross outliers. Finally, the method is illustrated using the ACTG protocol 315 data.

Friday, February 2, 2018
3:00-4:00PM, Haag Hall 309
Majid Bani-Yaghoub
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
A gentle introduction to theory and applications of nonlinear waves

ABSTRACT

The study of nonlinear waves covers a wide range of physical and biological phenomena. Nonlinear wave theory has provided tools for understanding and measuring various episodes such as gravitational waves emitted by two neutron stars, membrane shape-mediated wave propagation in a developing tissue, and epidemic waves of influenza (with this year’s predominant strain H3N2). In this talk, I will briefly describe the above mentioned examples and introduce the foundations of wave theory.

 


Mathematics Competitions

There are several Mathematics competitions throughout the year. UMKC students may be particularly interested in the “Integration Bee” and the “Missouri Collegiate Mathematics Competition”. Please contact Dr. Majid Bani-Yaghoub if you are interested in participating in any of math competitions listed below.

Integration Bee

Integration Bee is a contest for undergraduate students with prizes for the best skills in evaluating indefinite integrals. This is event is hosted annually by the Mathematics & Statistics Graduate Student Organization and the Math Club at UMKC.

Missouri Collegiate Mathematics Competition

Missouri Collegiate Mathematics Competition is an annual undergraduate level mathematics competition in Missouri since 1996. This event takes place in the Spring at the MAA MO meeting

The Mathematical Contest in Modeling

The Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications, COMAP, annually conducts a Mathematical Competition in Modeling (MCM) for teams of undergraduate college students. Historically, this contest takes place in early February.

ASA Student Paper Competition

All materials must be received by the ASA Section by December 15. Some sections have earlier deadlines so check each section’s website for dates. Winners will be notified by January 15. Competition winners must submit abstracts and register for JSM through the official JSM abstract submission system by the deadline.

SIGMAA – History of Mathematics Contest

Since 2004, HOMSIGMAA has sponsored a national contest for undergraduate History of Mathematics expository papers. In the eleven years since the awards began, UMKC has landed eight first places and two seconds.

William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition

The William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition is an annual contest for college students established in 1938 in memory of its namesake.

Contact Us

If you have questions about our programs or want to know more about studying Mathematics and Statistics at UMKC, get in touch with us.

General inquiry

Phone: (816) 235-1641
Fax: (816) 235-5517
Email: umkcmathdept@umkc.edu

Administrative Assistant: Tanya Henderson

Administration (click here)

Mailing address for the U.S. post office

UMKC Department of Mathematics and Statistics
5100 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499

Building address for UPS and other deliveries

UMKC Department of Mathematics and Statistics
206 Haag Hall
5120 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499

Graduate Program Courses

Course descriptions and prerequisites of the graduate courses

Pathway Course Schedules

Graduate Courses Chart

The Department offers the following courses as a part of the Graduate Program:

Mathematics Courses (3 Credit Hours each):

  • MATH 5509: General Algebra I
  • MATH 5510: Complex Variables I
  • MATH 5513: Real Variables I
  • MATH 5514: Mathematics for Secondary Teachers: Algebra and Analysis
  • MATH 5517: Matrix Theory I
  • MATH 5519: General Algebra II
  • MATH 5521: Differential Equations
  • MATH 5523: Real Variables II
  • MATH 5524: Mathematics for Secondary Teachers: Geometry
  • MATH 5527: Matrix Theory II [Not offered]
  • MATH 5530: Axiomatic Set Theory [Not offered]
  • MATH 5532: Advanced Numerical Analysis I
  • MATH 5534: Theory of Approximation [Not offered]
  • MATH 5542: Advanced Numerical Analysis II
  • MATH 5545: Mathematical Methods in Science and Engineering
  • MATH 5552: General Topology [Not offered]
  • MATH 5557: Functional Analysis [Not offered]
  • MATH 5590: Special Topics

Statistics Courses (3 Credit Hours each):

  • STAT 5501: Statistical Design of Experiments
  • STAT 5537: Mathematical Statistics I
  • STAT 5547: Mathematical Statistics II
  • STAT 5551: Applied Statistical Analysis
  • STAT 5561: Time Series Analysis
  • STAT 5565: Regression Analysis
  • STAT 5572: Multivariate Analysis
  • STAT 5576: Probability
  • STAT 5578: Advanced Mathematical Statistics
  • STAT 5588: Theory of General Linear Models
  • STAT 5590: Special Topics

Credit by Departmental Examination

Only the following courses are available for credit by a departmental examination which we administer:

Math 210 (Calculus I)
Math 220 (Calculus II)
Math 250 (Calculus III)

To be eligible for credit by Departmental Examination you must:

  1. Not have audited, or attempted the course for credit in the last 3 semesters anywhere.
  2. Be enrolled as a degree-seeking student at UMKC in the same semester in which you wish to take the examination.
  3. Take the departmental examination by the end of that same semester.
  4. Earn at least a grade of C on the examination, as determined by the department.

Before taking a Departmental Examination, you must complete the following steps in the order given:

  1. Print this Credit by Departmental Examination Form.
    Follow the directions on this form, including the following:
  2. Get the Calculus Coordinator Dr. Liana Sega’s Approval signature. (The “Instructor” indicated on the form.)
  3. Get your Dean’s Approval signature.
  4. Get the Registrar’s Approval signature on the form. [They check that you have met the conditions above for enrollment, and not auditing or attempting the course in the last 3 semesters.]
  5.  Pay the fees at the Cashier’s Office at the Administrative Center, 5115 Oak St., for attempting credit by departmental exam (Payment equal to 1 credit hour.)
  6. Return the form to the Registrar’s Office as indicated on the form itself.
    The Calculus Coordinator Dr. Liana Sega can tell you about the date and time we schedule such Departmental Examinations.

Degree Programs

The department offers both undergraduate and graduate degree options as well as fast track programs.

 

The department offers coursework leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics, the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, Double Degree/Major in Mathematics and related fields, and Mathematics Minor.

Learn more about our undergraduate programs.

The department offers coursework leading to the Master of Science in Mathematics, and the Master of Science in Statistics. The department also participates in the UMKC School of Graduate Studies Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program with emphasis in Mathematics or Statistics.

Learn more about our graduate programs.

The department also offers students an opportunity to meet the full requirements of the BS and MS in a shorter time period than the separate degree programs. The students may complete a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Statistics in four years and the Master’s degree in Mathematics or Statistics the fifth year.

Learn more about our Fast Track programs.

News & Events

Math & Stat Colloquium Series

The 2019-2020 Colloquium Series is held every Friday according to the posted schedule from 3:00 to 4:00 in Haag Hall room 201. The Colloquium Series is open to the public, and we highly recommend that graduate students attend. Read More

Department Newsletter

The department publishes the UMKC RooMath Newsletter annually that contains both student and departmental news. If you are interested in receiving the UMKC RooMath Newsletter electronically, please submit send an email to Dr. Majid Bani-Yaghoub with subject “RooMath Newsletter”.

RooMath Newsletter 2019-2020

RooMath Newsletter Archives

2004-2005    2006-2007    2008-2009    2010-2011

2012    2013    2014    2015    2016    2017   2018    2019 

Recent & Upcoming Events

Kansas City Mathematics Teaching Technology EXPO

October 4th and 5th 2019, Haag Hall

The Kansas City Mathematics Technology EXPO is a forum for mathematics instructors at both the college and secondary levels to demonstrate how they use technology successfully in their teaching, to learn about new mathematics technology, and to discuss the philosophy and future of technology in the mathematics classroom. Kansas City Mathematics Teaching Technology EXPO will be held in Haag Hall on the campus of the University of Missouri Kansas City.

 

Tackling the GRE Mathematics Subject Test (Organized by MSGSO)

  • Time: 3:00 PM – 3:50 PM
  • Day: Friday (10/04/19)
  • Location: Haag Hall 201

Speaker: Bryan Harris

Audience: Anyone thinking about going to grad school in mathematics, and anyone curious to know what the test expects out of its takers. This talk is open to the public.

Abstract: The Mathematics Subject GRE exam, administered by ETS, is a standardized test used by many graduate programs in mathematics to measure the overall mathematical ability and general knowledge of prospective students. In this talk, we will briefly discuss ETS’s website and how to find general information about the exam. We will look at and discuss the released 2001 exam to get a basic idea of what subjects are on the test, what the test makers expect out of those sitting for the exam, and various tips and strategies for achieving one’s best score on the exam. We will then have the audience work on select problems under similar constraints to the actual exam.

Math Club Fall 2019 meeting schedule 

Math Club meeting are open to the public. Please feel free to join us and have interesting math discussions.

Date Time Location
September 9 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
September 23 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
October 7 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
October 21 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
November 4 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
November 18 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
December 2 10-10:45 AM Royall 203

 

Latex Workshop Organized by MSGSO

  • Time: 2:00 PM – 2:50 PM
  • Day: Friday (9/13/19)
  • Location: Haag Hall 307

This workshop is open to the public and will be for those who would like to learn about LaTeX with a focus on creating project documents that include

  • Title page
  • Table of contents
  • Including graphics
  • Making (simple) diagrams using mathcha

It’s recommended that you bring your laptop and create an account on overleaf and mathcha (both have free membership and are easily accessible). This workshop will highlight an essential part of graduate school: professionally presenting and preserving your work. This workshop will be a great introduction to LaTeX, if you aren’t yet familiar with it. Experienced users and newbies are welcome!

Mathematics and Statistics Research Day

Friday, April 17, 2020
Time: 10:00 am-3:00 pm
Location: Miller Nichols Learning Center, Room 352

The Mathematics and Statistics Research Day is an annual event celebrating student and faculty research, creative, and scholarly activities. This event is open to public and it promotes research in mathematics, statistics, and the applications in various fields.

Integration Bee

Friday, April 24, 2020
Time: 11:00 am-1:00 pm
Location: Miller Nichols Learning Center, Room 352

The Integration Bee is a contest for undergraduates and high school students with prizes for the best skills in evaluating indefinite integrals. This event is hosted by the UMKC Math Club. Everyone is welcome. Whether you are a participant or an audience there will be plenty of snacks and drinks for everyone.

 

Faculty Research

UMKC Faculty Research Symposium

Our faculty members have diverse research interests including topics in statistics, applied mathematics and pure mathematics. Most of the research topics are interdisciplinary in nature.

Statistics

Dr. Kamel Rekab has wide-ranging experience as an investigator and consultant in industrial statistics and medical statistics, and the statistical analysis of such topics as Infrasound Classifier Development, Sleep Apnea Avoidance, Sediment Flow, Neurological Responses of Stroke Victims, Mammography, Automated Testing, Cough Reflex, and Structural Bonding Processes, among others.

Dr. Yong Zeng’s research is in the interdisciplinary areas of Probability, Statistics, Financial Econometrics, and Mathematical Finance. He is especially interested in modeling the partially observed dynamic of transactions data (or high-frequency data, trade-by-trade data) using marked point processes, and in Bayesian inference via filtering for the dynamic. Dr. Zeng also models the term structure of interest rates, stock prices, and pricing options. In January 2011, Dr. Yong Zeng received a UM System Research Board grant for $24,700, titled “Statistical Inference for Marked Point Processes and Related Topics”. In September 2012, he has been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant for his research project entitled: “Statistical Analysis for Partially-Observed Markov Processes with Marked Point Process Observations”.

Dr. An-Lin Cheng is the Director of Research and Statistical Consult Service. Dr. Cheng is affiliated with the UMKC School of Medicine and she is a member of doctoral faculty at the Mathematics and Statistics. Dr. Cheng has worked with researchers from a wide range of disciplines such as dentistry, nursing, biomedical engineering, statistics, biostatistics, environmental sciences, and medicine.

Dr. Sangbeak (Sam) Ye’s research is focused on Sequential mastery detection and Bayesian learning promotion under cognitive diagnosis models. Dr. Ye has used sequential change-detection methods under the cognitive diagnosis models in E-learning assessments. He also constructed statistical models for the didactic value of items that readily leads to a sequential learning enhancement and learning detection procedure. Dr. Ye is currently affiliated with the UMKC School of Nursing. He is also a member of doctoral faculty at the Mathematics and Statistics.

Applied Mathematics

The UMKC Applied Mathematics Group is a research group within the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at University of Missouri-Kansas City. The applied mathematics group has interdisciplinary research interests in the areas of mathematical biology, scientific computations, applied analysis, and numerical linear algebra. See the Applied Mathematics Group Activities.

Mathematics

Dr. Majid Bani-Yaghoub has research interests in  partial, delay and ordinary differential equations. His area of expertise include mathematical modeling, nonlinear waves in ecology and numerical simulations nonlocal delay reaction-diffusion models. His current research is focused on modeling and analysis of infectious diseases with multiple transmission pathways.

Dr. Xianping Li is enthusiastic about research in scientific computation and mesh adaptation, especially for anisotropic diffusion problems. His current research focuses on parallel computing and mesh adaptation for three-dimensional anisotropic diffusion problems and their applications. He is also interested in numerical computation in many fields including engineering, biology, finance, and physics.

Dr. Noah Rhee’s research interests include Numerical linear algebra, numerical stability analysis, and approximations of Frobenius-Perron operators via interpolations.

Dr. Eric Hall does research in set theory, especially on models of set theory in which the Axiom of Choice does not hold. Some of his recent publications are on Axiom of Choice issues in general topology.

Dr. Liana Sega does research in commutative algebra and focuses on homological properties of finitely generated modules over commutative Noetherian (local) rings. She recently helped discover an important counterexample to a conjecture of Auslander about certain properties of Gorenstein rings. In August 2011, Dr. Liana Sega has been awarded two separate research grants. The first grant is from the Simons Foundation “Simons Collaboration Grants for Mathematicians” The second grant is for 2011-2014 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the amount of $85,843 for her proposal “Homological Behavior of Modules over Commutative Local Rings”.

 

      

 

Fast Track Programs

There are mathematics and statistics fast track programs that offer students an opportunity to meet the full requirements of the BS and MS in Mathematics and Statistics in a shorter time period than the separate degree programs.

The students may complete a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Statistics in four years and the Master’s degree in Mathematics or Statistics the fifth year. More information is available in the following links.

Mathematics Fast Track Program

Statistics Fast Track Program

Forms and Documents for Graduate Program

 

GTA Application Form

Evaluation of Fitness for Graduate Studies

Master Plan of Study Form

 

I.Ph.D. Application to Take Comprehensive Examination

I.Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination Approval Form (for I.Ph.D. students with Mathematics as the Co-discipline)

I.Ph.D. Plan of Study (on School of Graduate Studies Page)

I.Ph.D. Flowchart

 

Topics for I.Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination

Mathematics and Statistics Dissertation LaTex Template

Mathematics and Statistics Recent Theses and Dissertations

Graduate Programs

Overview

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers coursework leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees in mathematics and statistics. The department also participates in the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. (iPh.D.) program offered by the UMKC School of Graduate Studies, where the emphasis may be in either mathematics or statistics. As listed below, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics provides a variety of graduate degree options.

Interdisciplinary Ph.D. (I.Ph.D)

The students may choose Mathematics or Statistics as the principle discipline and another field as the co-discipline. A PhD degree in Statistics or Mathematics opens the door to several well-paying professional jobs such as Research Scientist, Assistant Professor, Data Scientist, Senior Analyst,  and  Statistical Modeling Manager.

Degree Requirements for Interdisciplinary Ph.D.

Master of Science in Mathematics

Our master’s degree program in mathematics allows students to sharpen their skills in different areas of  mathematics such as applied mathematics, algebra or analysis. It prepares the student to purse professional careers  such as Mathematics Instructor/Teacher, Senior Budget Analyst, Math & Stat Modeler, Accounting Supervisor, Modeling and Simulation Analyst, Imaging Scientist, Systems Engineer, Consultant and Actuarial Analyst.

Student Learning Outcomes and Degree Requirements
Master Plan of Study Form

Master of Science in Statistics

There is a high regional demand for individuals with a master’s degree in statistics. Our master’s degree program in statistics prepares the students for professional careers  such as  Statistician, Biostatistician,  Data Scientist,  Stat Instructor, Consultant and Data Analyst.

Student Learning Outcomes and Degree Requirements

Master Plan of Study Form

Financial Support

Students can apply for a Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) position, which comes with a stipend of about $12,000 per year and a tuition waiver for up to 9 credit hours per regular semester. Summer teaching is often available, for an additional salary of $2,000-$4,000. Individuals may apply for a GTA position, by filling out the GTA Application Form and three letters of reference to be sent directly to the Principal Graduate Advisor Dr. Sega segal@umkc.edu.

Students can also apply for a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) position, which comes with a stipend, ranging from $20,000 to $25,000. For more information, please contact Dr. Majid Bani-Yaghoub.

Application

Application and Admission

Forms and Documents

Graduate Courses

Internships

Math & Stat Internships provide a positive learning experience for students by allowing the development of professional skills and an assessment of possible career paths.

  • There are several internship opportunities available in the Kansas City metropolitan area such as internships offered by Sprint, Cerner and H&R Block. There are also internships listed by AMS
  •  Deadlines for summer programs usually occur during the previous Fall or Winter. There are also many applications due January- March of each year.
  • Also, the UMKC Career Services provides a limited number of  Internship Stipend for unpaid internships.

Students may earn course credit while working as an intern for a company or for a government agency. The following regulations apply to students who wish course credit for an internship.

  1.  The course number for internship is Stat496 or Math 496 (depending on the contents).
  2.  Each credit hour requires 75 hours of internship work
  3. Internship credit is not available for duties performed in current or prior employment.
  4. Course credit is awarded only if the internship involves a substantial amount of mathematics and/or statistics.
  5. Examples of math/stat related work are scientific computation and programming, data analysis, mathematical modeling and analysis. To get an idea, click here for a tutorial; see also the table of contents and  the examples provided in IBM such as Linear Regression,  SPSS Time Series Modeler, Bootstrapping, Categorical Regression,Categorical Principal Components Analysis, Cluster analysis, Nonlinear Regression and the description of the sample files. Note that you have access to SPSS through UMKC Remote Lab.
  6. All internships need to be approved by the math (undergraduate or graduate) academic advisor before enrolling in Math496 or Stat 496.
  7. The student is required to write a report on the internship (for a typical 3‐credit hour internship, 8-10 pages should be considered).
  8. The report should describe the duties performed by the student, how the duties related to mathematics or statistics, any new mathematics/statistics learned, and personal growth from the experience.

Applying for Internships: A Key Step Towards A Successful Math & Stat Career Path

“During the school year, students may feel overwhelmed with coursework, sports, or co-curricular activities that may keep them extremely busy while leaving no time to think of doing an internship or a job. However, Internships are a proven way to gain relevant knowledge, skills, and experience while establishing important connections in the field. Internships may be completed during fall or spring semester or full time over the course of the summer.”
https://www.thebalance.com/is-an-internship-really-all-that-important-1986800

 

“My time at Lockton Companies this semester was very informative. I was able to bring my math skills into play with real world applications. A typical week for me was between 20-30 hours. Lockton, currently, is focusing its efforts on a US strategic plan that I was able to assist with. In this strategic plan, I was in charge of pulling data from historical records and projecting growth. I also was able to model what needs to be accomplished for Lockton to grow at the rate they have in mind. For that to happen, I needed projected hires, ramp rates, etc. This allowed me to not only work more with modeling, which I had not had much experience with, but it also gave me the exposure to people in our company as I reached out for help.”
Another thing that I did this semester was dive into the “personality” tests that we have producers take. I was able to look at their scores on the three tests that we give, and figure out not only what the range of scores is to be a successful producer at Lockton, but I was able to project how a producer would score on test 2 or 3 based on how they scored on test 1 with correlation coefficients. For this I analyzed revenue by producer and assessed who we already know is a successful producer. My bosses found value in my work, and value in how I suggested the data should be cut to get optimal outputs.

I am very grateful for my time at Lockton this past year. I accepted a position, in fall of 2017, at Black and Veatch as an entry level position in their management consulting division with the title of ‘analyst’. I strongly believe that my experience at Lockton helped me attain the job. My 2 bosses were very encouraging of my leaving Lockton, and they have continued to give me the tools that I need to be successful. Major Mary Ellen Cox, Math Major 2018

 

Interview with Math Major Mary Ellen Cox: Summer Internship in Kansas City

  1. You obtained a summer internship this year and worked full time during the summer. Could you let us know about the company and its clients?

I obtained an internship for Lockton Companies. Lockton is the world’s largest privately held Insurance Broker. I specifically worked within the holding company which was located in the Kansas City office, but just one of the floors. Lockton has many different types of clients because companies big and small all need the services that Lockton provides. This summer Lockton in Kansas City hired 25 interns, some of them for the holding company and some working for the Kansas City office.

  1. What kind of questions can we expect in an internship interview?

My interview process with the company was excellent. I interviewed directly with the performance coach that I ended up working with this summer, and the COO of the U.S. company. I did not get many questions like the ones that I would usually prepare for in an interview; it was more of a conversation. The people at Lockton really seemed to want to get to know me as a person through the process.

  1.  Name a few specific skills needed to do your job.               

To do my job, which was in the Operations Department, I used a lot of analytical skills, soft skills, leadership, creativity, time management, and teamwork. Being good at Excel was a major plus to my internship, as there was not one project that I worked on where I did not use Excel.  I had 3 major presentations this summer, so being a strong public speaker was a key aspect of why I feel like my summer was very successful.

  1. What are the career expectations and characteristics of your internship?

This summer my internship consisted of being given a broad question and trying to answer that question with the use of large data sets. I was asked multiple questions, anywhere from growth of the company to new markets. Once I found a way to convey what I wanted to say through the data, I was able to make deliverables to give my boss and the other executives to help them present about the issue at hand.

My career expectations are to do something like a big data and consulting role. I enjoyed this summer and how I was able to take a large data set and project future growth, or look at past trends, and then try to make inferences about what that means for the company and what we could do about it. I know that I could excel in continuing with work similar to what I have done this summer.

  1. Where and how did you use mathematics or statistics in your internship?

I used statistics in my internship through many of my projects. Some of the data that we used, we were given, and some we had to collect. Within the data sets, we had to manipulate the formulas and numbers in Excel to do many different things like projecting growth. We had to find out which of the offices were not growing at adequate rates, project growth for the future with current trends, and see where the focus should be to correct the problems.

In this internship, we focused a lot on trends. We looked specifically at the New Hires of the company and their experiences. We had to find a way to quantify that to see what offices were doing above or below average, what departments were doing above or below average, and then how that played out through each office. This allowed us to see the trends in what Lockton can improve on.

These are just 2 examples of what I did this summer. I completed 3 personal presentations, and 6 separate deliverables for my supervisor’s presentations.

  1. What math or stat skill would you like to learn to be better at your internship?

I would like to gain knowledge in statistical software, specifically SPSS, SASS, and R. I worked a lot with the analytics team this summer and I had some exposure to the software, but I personally did not have a chance to learn about it. I would like to learn about this software because it can help me solve problems independently.

I know that this summer was just the start to a lot of practical applications of what I am learning in school. I would still like to continue to take in everything that I can.

  1. Tell us about your supervisors and their roles in training and preparing you for a future career.

I had 2 supervisors, one was the Director of Development and the other was the Vice President of Operations. They both did an excellent job in training me this summer and preparing me for my future. They gave me questions and helped guide me, without being too overbearing and controlling. I am going to continue to intern with them throughout the school year and hope to learn much more from them.

  1. Do you consider the same company and job as a future career?

I have really enjoyed my summer, the work I have done, and the company itself. I would absolutely consider this company for my future.

  1. What are the most satisfying and most frustrating parts of your job as an intern?

The most satisfying part is how much I am able to learn with such wonderful people. The most frustrating is that, as an intern, you are not taken as seriously as full time associates.

  1. In what ways, have you benefitted from having a summer internship?

I have benefitted greatly from having an internship. I now have the guidance of many people throughout the company that I met networking this summer. I also have some name recognition on my resume that I did not have before.

  1. What advice would you give to other Math and Stat majors who will serve as an intern?

Get credit for it! So many of the other interns that I worked with this summer did not realize that they could have received credit for it through their school. Working 40 hours a week was a lot and it was nice to double dip that with credits.

  1. Who or what inspired you to become a Math and Stat major?

I’ve always seen myself doing something in this field.  Math has been something that I have enjoyed from a very young age, so it made sense for me to continue with it.

  1. If you were not a Math and Stat major, you would be …?

If I was not a math or stat major, I would most likely be doing something in the Law field. I originally came into college in the 6 year law program, I soon realized that I did not want to follow that track long term because I was not enjoying †he work that I was doing. I still wonder what would have happened if I did not switch.

  1. Tell us about the Math and Stat professors at UMKC.

They’re all awesome, very informative and helpful.

  1. Where do you see yourself in the next 5 years?

Successful. I hope to have moved up within the company I decide on and be doing something that allows me to use my skills adequately.

  1. What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

I enjoy going to the River Market on the weekends, playing with my dog, and hanging out with my friends.

  1. Name your favorite blogs or books you have read and would recommend to others.

I am a big advocate for the Wall Street Journal.

 

 

Degree Requirements for iPh.D.

In order to complete the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. (iPh.D.) with Mathematics or Statistics as the primary discipline, students are expected to complete the following requirements:

  1. Qualifying Coursework:
    1. A student who is admitted to the iPh.D. program while having not completed all of the qualifying coursework as described below is required to complete the missing courses with a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
    2. The qualifying courses for the iPh.D. are as follows:
      1. Mathematics Emphasis:
        MATH 5509: General Algebra I
        MATH 5513: Real Variables I
        MATH 5532: Advanced Numerical Analysis I
        MATH 5510: Complex Variables I
        MATH 5521: Differential Equations
        MATH 5545: Mathematical Methods in Science and Engineering
      2. Statistics Emphasis:
        STAT 5501: Statistical Design of Experiments
        MATH 5513: Real Variables I
        STAT 5537: Mathematical Statistics I
        STAT 5547: Mathematical Statistics II
        STAT 5551: Applied Statistical Analysis
        STAT 5565: Regression Analysis
        STAT 5572: Multivariate Analysis
  2. Following the completion of 18 hours of course work, the student is required to submit the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Plan of Study form. This form can be found on the School of Graduate Studies Webpage for forms.
  3. Doctoral Course Work
    1. Following the completion of the Qualifying Coursework, the student needs to complete the Doctoral Coursework as described below.
    2. Mathematics Emphasis
      1. MATH 5519: General Algebra II
      2. MATH 5523: Real Variables II
      3. MATH 5542: Advanced Numerical Analysis II
      4. Any one of STAT 5576, STAT 5578, or STAT 5588.
    3. Statistics Emphasis
      1. STAT 5576: Probability and Measure
      2. STAT 5578: Advanced Mathematical Statistics
      3. STAT 5588: Theory of General Linear Models
      4. Any one of MATH 5519, MATH 5523, or MATH 5542.
  4. Qualifying Examinations
    Within a year of completing the Doctoral Coursework, the student is required to complete the iPh.D. qualifying examinations.  The written examinations under either emphasis are based on two of the three Doctoral courses.

    1. For the Mathematics emphasis, the qualifying examinations are based on two of the following Doctoral courses: MATH 5519, MATH 5523, and MATH 5542.
    2. For the Statistics emphasis, the written examinations are based on two of the following Doctoral courses: STAT 5576, STAT 5578, and STAT 5588.
    3. The student may take one written examination from the opposite emphasis if his or her supervisory committee deems it in the best interest of the student’s Plan of Study, provided that the student has taken the course on which the examination is based.
    4. The two exams must be taken within a two-week period.
    5. If a student fails one or more qualifying examination(s) on the first attempt, the student may retake the failed parts from the first attempt after a period of twelve (12) weeks.  If the student fails the qualifying examination(s) a second time, he or she is terminated from the iPh.D. program in Mathematics.
  5. Comprehensive Examination
    1. Within two years of successful completion of the qualifying examinations, the student is required to complete the iPh.D. Comprehensive Examination.
    2. The iPh.D. Comprehensive examination consists of both a written portion and an oral portion.
      1. The written portion of the examination is developed by the student’s supervisory committee, and it consists of questions related to the student’s research and possible avenues for future work.  The student is allotted two (2) weeks to complete the written portion of the examination.
      2. Following the completion of the written portion of the Comprehensive Examination, the student shall submit his or her responses to each member of the supervisory committee.
      3. The oral portion of the Comprehensive Examination occurs approximately two (2) weeks after the student has submitted his or her written portion of the examination.  The oral portion is a two-hour session between the student and the members of the supervisory committee in which the student describes his or her research and fields questions and comments related to the responses provided in the written portion of the examination.
      4. Following the completion of the iPh.D. Comprehensive Examination, the student is admitted to Candidacy.  Following admission to Candidacy, the student is required to complete at least twelve (12) Research and Thesis credit hours.
      5. In the event that the student fails either the written or the oral portion of the Comprehensive Examination, he or she may retake the examination after a period of twelve (12) weeks, per School of Graduate Studies regulations.  A failure of either part of the examination a second time will result in the student’s termination from the iPh.D. program.
  6. Dissertation and Final Oral Examination
    1. Within two years of admission to Candidacy, the student is required to have completed the necessary research and writing to form the Dissertation.  Once the Dissertation has been written, the student is required to complete the Final Oral Examination.
    2. The Final Oral Examination is a two-hour discussion between the student and the supervisory committee.  The student must prepare a presentation that outlines the content of the Dissertation.
    3. The presentation is a public event, so anyone is free to attend.
    4. Following the completion of the presentation, a closed-door session takes place between the student and the supervisory committee.  During this session, the Candidate fields questions and comments regarding the content of the Dissertation.
    5. Following successful completion of the Final Oral Examination, the committee will make recommendations for revisions to the dissertation, and the Candidate is required to address these recommendations in order to complete the Interdisciplinary Ph.D.
  7. Additional Notes:
    1. All iPh.D. students with Mathematics as the primary discipline are required to attend at least five Department Graduate Seminars per semester in addition to the required course work.
    2. The student is also required to complete the required course work set forth by his or her co-discipline.
    3. The student must satisfy all requirements set forth by the School of Graduate Studies.

Minor in Actuarial Science

What is an actuary?

“Through their knowledge of statistics, finance, and business, actuaries assess the risk of events occurring and help create policies that minimize risk and its financial impact on companies and clients. One of the main functions of actuaries is to help businesses assess the risk of certain events occurring and formulate policies that minimize the cost of that risk.” – Bureau of Labor Statistics

Who can earn the minor?

The minor is open to UMKC undergraduate students in all majors, though it is most beneficial if the student is a mathematics, business, accounting or economics major due to the courses required for the minor. To add the minor in your degree plan, please contact Dr. Bani-Yaghoub (baniyaghoubm@umkc.edu)

What are the benefits of completing the minor?

Some of the courses in the minor prepare the students for the first four actuarial exams. Most companies that hire actuaries would like to see that the students have passed at least the first two exams before graduation. KC Companies that actively recruit include Mercer, Aetna, GEICO, Anthem and Lockton. Some courses in the minor meet the Validation by Educational Experience (VEE) requirements. Taking these courses while at UMKC means that you won’t have to take them somewhere else after you graduate.

Where do I find more information about actuaries?

  1. Career path and the exams 
  2. Associate of the Society of Actuaries (ASA)
  3. ASA Pathway
  4. Becoming an Actuary 
  5. Department of Labor Occupational Outlook handbook 
  6. American Academy of Actuaries 
  7. Society of Actuaries
  8. Casualty Actuarial Society 

How do I add the Minor in Actuarial Science to my degree plan?

  1. Fill out the DOM form (leave the sections “primary” and “secondary” blank)
  2. Send the form to Dr. Bani-Yaghoub (baniyaghoubm@umkc.edu

Course requirements for the Minor in Actuarial Science

The student must complete the following courses (28 credits):

Mathematics
Math 220 Calculus II (4 credit hour)
Economics
ECON 201 Introduction to Economics I (Macroeconomics, 3 chr, Needs grade B- or higher for VEE)
ECON 202 Introduction to Economics II (Microeconomics, 3 chr, Needs grade B- or higher for VEE)
Accounting
ACCTNG 210 Introduction To Financial Accounting (3 chr)
Finance
FIN 325 Financial Management (3 chr, Needs grade B- or higher for VEE)
FIN 345 Investments (3 chr, Prepares students for Exam 2(FM), Financial Mathematics )
Statistics
Stat 436 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I (3 chr, Prepares the students for Probability Exam 1(P) Note: Some problems of Exam 1(P) needs knowledge of Stat 235 -Elementary Statistics)

Also, take two courses from the following list (electives):

Stat 441 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics II (3 chr, Prepares the students for Exam 4(C)– Part I, Construction of Actuarial Models, currently known as Exam STAM: Short-Term Actuarial Mathematics)
Stat 496 Internship (Must be related to actuarial science, More information)
Stat 480 Statistical Models in Actuarial Science (3 chr, Prepares the students for Exam 4(C)– Part II, Construction of Actuarial Models, currently known as Exam STAM: Short-Term Actuarial Mathematics)
Stat 482 Statistical Models for Life Contingencies (3 chr, Prepares the students for Exam 3 (MLC)– Part I, Models for Life Contingencies, currently known as  Exam LTAM: Long-Term Actuarial Mathematics)
Stat 484 Actuarial Theory of Pensions and Social Security (3 chr, Prepares the students for Exam 3 (MLC)– Part II, Models for Life Contingencies)

Prerequisite Trees:

Math 210         →   Math 220         →   Stat 436           →   Stat 441.

Stat 436           →   Stat 480.

Stat 436           →   Stat 482           →   Stat 484.

 

Acctng 210      →   Fin 325            →   Fin 345.

Econ 201       → Econ 202

 

Plan of Study

Case 1: Student starts in fall

Fall Math 210, ACCTNG 210, ECON 201
Spring Math 220, ECON 202
(Summer) (Math 250 recommended)
Fall FIN 325, Stat 436
Spring FIN 345, Stat 441 (Stat 480 recommended*)
Fall Stat 482
(Spring) (Stat 484 recommended**)

* Stat 480 prepares for Actuarial Exam 4(C)

** Stat 484 prepares for Actuarial Exam 3(MLC).

 

Case 2 Student starts in spring

Spring Math 210, ACCTNG 210, ECON 201
Summer Math 220
Fall FIN 325, Stat 436 (Math 250 recommended)
Spring FIN 345, Stat 441 (Stat 480 recommended*)
Fall Stat 482, ECON 202
(Spring) (Stat 484 recommended**)

* Stat 480 prepares for Actuarial Exam 4(C)

** Stat 484 prepares for Actuarial Exam 3(MLC).

 

Case 3: Student starts in spring and does not take summer classes

Spring Math 210, ACCTNG 210
Fall Math 220, ECON 201
Spring* ECON 202, FIN 325, (Math 250 recommended)
Fall Stat 436, FIN 345
Spring Stat 441, Stat 480 (Stat 482 recommended)
(Fall) (Stat 484 recommended*)

* Stat 484 prepares for Actuarial Exam 3(MLC).

Mathematics Fast Track Program

Overview

This program offers students an opportunity to meet the full requirements of the BS and MS in a shorter time period than the separate degree programs. The students may complete a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Statistics in four years and the Master’s degree in Mathematics the fifth year. Fast-track students may also apply for graduate teaching assistant (GTA) positions, by filling out the GTA Application Form.

Admission Requirements

  1. The applicant must be a UMKC undergraduate student who has completed a minimum of 60 cumulative credit hours (preferably between  60 to 90 credit hours).
  2. The applicant should complete the BS/MS application form and submit it to both the undergraduate and graduate advisors as listed on Academic Advising page.
  3. The applicant must satisfactorily complete the following courses:
    1.  Math 300: Linear Algebra I
    2. Math 301: On Solid Ground: Sets and Proof, or any 400 level class that has Math 301 as a prerequisite. For instance, Math 410, Math 420 or Math 402.
  4. A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 is required.
  5. A minimum GPA of 3.2 in Math/Stat courses is required.

B.S. Degree Requirements (total of 33 credit hours)

As listed below, there are 24 credit hours required undergraduate courses.

  • Math 210: Calculus I
  • Math 220: Calculus II
  • Math 250: Calculus III
  • Math 300: Linear Algebra I
  • Math 345: Ordinary Differential Equations, or Math 406: Partial Differential Equations, or Math 430: Numerical Analysis I, or Stat 436: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I
  • Math 402: Advanced Analysis I
  • Math 410: Modern Algebra, or Math 420: Linear Algebra II

The student should also take at least 9 credit hours of Math or Stat elective courses at the 400- level or above.

M.S. Degree Requirements (total of 30 credit hours)

The following core courses are required for the completion of the M.S. degree:

  • Math 5509 General Algebra I
  • Math 5510: Complex Variables I
  • Math 5513: Real Variables I
  • Math 5521: Differential Equations
  • Math 5532: Advanced Numerical Analysis I
  • Math 5545: Mathematical Methods in Science and Engineering

Also a total of 12 Credit hours of Math or Stat elective courses at the 400-level or above must be completed satisfactorily.

B.S./M.S. Degree Overlap (up to 9 credit hours)

Up to 9 credit hours of 400-level Math or Stat courses in the graduate degree can overlap with the courses taken towards satisfying the requirements for the undergraduate degree.

Math Placement Exam and Course Support

Math Placement Exam (ALEKS)

Check the details and take the exam from the Math Placement Exam (ALEKS) page.

Math Tutorial Help

College Algebra Resources

Calculus Resources

Courses with Common Final Exams

Math 110 (College Algebra), Math 210 (Calculus I), and Stat 235 (Elementary Statistics) are the only courses that have a Common Final Exam. These exams are given at the end of Fall and Spring Semesters, but not Summer Semesters.

The Common Final Exams are scheduled on the Saturday at the end of the last (partial) week of classes, and follow the two Arts and Sciences “Reading Days” on Thursday and Friday. Your Math 110, Math 210, or Stat 235 instructor will provide further details (exact time, room, type of exam questions, and so on) near the end of the Current Semester.

Credit by Examination

Students can “test out” some courses in the following two ways.

  1. Through the UMKC College Level Examination Program (CLEP) you can “test out” of two undergraduate mathematics courses:
    1. Math 110 (College Algebra)
    2. Math 120 (Precalculus)

    Our department does not administer these tests. The CLEP tests are administered at the UMKC Counseling and Testing Center located in Suite 206, (Old) Student Services Building, 4825 Troost, (816) 235-1635, open M-F, 8 am – 5 pm. For complete CLEP information see the UMKC site for CLEP. Our department accepts the results of these tests. But, be sure to check with your own department or school first since some (for instance, the School of Pharmacy) do not accept CLEP credits.

  2. Within the Department of Mathematics and Statistics only the following courses
    are available for credit by a departmental examination which we administer:

    1. Math 210 (Calculus I)
    2. Math 220 (Calculus II)
    3. Math 250 (Calculus III)

    For our specific department information visit: Credit by Departmental Examination.

Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate

Credit for certain courses is awarded for sufficiently high scores on AP exams or Higher Level IB exams, as follows.

  • For AP (Advanced Placement) Calculus:
    Calculus AB — Score: 3 or above — Transfers as: Math 210 (Calculus I) (4 credit hours).
    Calculus BC — Score: 3 or above — Transfers as: Both Math 210 (Calculus I) and Math 220 (Calculus II) (each 4 credit hours).
    For full UMKC details see AP on Registration and Records webpage.
  • For AP (Advanced Placement) Statistics:
    Score: 4 or above — Transfers as: Stat 235 (Elementary Statistics) (3 credit hours).
    For full UMKC details see AP on Registration and Records webpage.
  • For IB (International Baccalaureate) Mathematics:
    IB Examination for Mathematics HL (Higher Level) — Score: 5 or above — Transfers as: Math 210 (Calculus I) (4 credit hours).
    For full UMKC details see IB on Registration and Records webpage.

Internship Courses- Math 496 and Stat 496

Internships provide a positive learning experience for students by allowing the development of professional skills and an assessment of possible career paths

More  information 

 

Diagrams for Undergraduate Courses

Diagrams for Graduate Courses

Math Student Organizations

Mathematics & Statistics Graduate Student Organization (MSGSO)

MSGSO
The purpose of MSGSO is to represent the graduate student body of the UMKC Department of Mathematics and Statistics; to provide a forum for graduate student opinion; to act as a voice for the graduate students in matters of mutual interest to graduate faculty and students; and to promote professional interest and fellowship among the graduate students.

Location: Manheim Hall Room 304 F (Convergence Room)
President: Bryan Harris
Vice President: Matthew M. McCoy
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Majid Bani Yaghoub

 

UMKC Math Club

Math Club
Math Club promotes interactions between faculty and undergraduate students; provides math-related activities such as problem of the week, math movie nights, and math contests; invites math alumni and various employers to give an insight of the current math job market; facilitates communication between math graduate and undergraduate students.

Location: Manheim Hall Room 304 F (Convergence Room)
President: Ashley Parmenter
Vice President: Danielle Grant
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Majid Bani Yaghoub

Fall 2019 Semester meeting schedule:

Date Time Location
September 9 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
September 23 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
October 7 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
October 21 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
November 4 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
November 18 10-10:45 AM Royall 203
December 2 10-10:45 AM Royall 203

 


UMKC Chess Club

Chess Club
The purpose of the UMKC Chess Club is to provide a friendly environment in which its members may play, instruct, and discuss chess. The Chess Club will  hold at least one open tournament annually. The Chess Club is dedicated to advancing chess by offering instruction to all UMKC students and future students.

Location: Manheim Hall Room 304 F (Convergence Room)
President: Sarmila Venkoba Sah
Vice President: Luke Nayak
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Majid Bani Yaghoub

Meet Our Students

Mathematics & Statistics students at UMKC come from all over the world and explore diverse interests. Get to know our students, and you’ll learn what our programs are about.

Empowering Girls in Math

Daiwa Emmert combines her strength training and math experiences to empower girls in the classroom. Below is a short interview with Daiwa. You can read the full story at the end.

Why did you choose UMKC?

Growing up, I came to Kansas City a lot to go visit my grandparents and attend Chiefs games. I knew I wanted to experience a different culture in a big city.

You have a unique name. What’s the story? 

Daiwa—it rhymes with Iowa! It means “sweet harmony” in Japanese. It’s also a brand of fishing reel my dad uses.

Why did you choose math?

I started at UMKC as a biology major, but after my first semester, I didn’t really feel like it fit. I was more drawn to the calculus class I was taking, but I still wanted to make an impact in the community. So, I ended up changing my field of study to a double major with math and secondary education.

What are the challenges and benefits of the program?

When you get to upper level mathematics, it is not going to focus on just the calculations; proving statements is just as important. It takes a long time to develop the skills needed to be able to logically explain a solution without flaws.

The benefits are challenging myself and meeting people with the same love for math.

What are your lifelong goals?

My biggest goal is to have a family and become a high school or college teacher in math. I just want to be an influence on younger girls — especially in math. I connect with math, the repetition connected with me. I’ve had teachers who were passionate about math and I want to have that kind of positive impact.

[Update: Now that Daiwa graduated from UMKC and is a high school math teacher, her new goal is to teach college-level math at high school.]

Who do you admire most at UMKC?

I admire the faculty and staff that I have interacted with. They are so supportive and really express how much they care about my success.

What’s your greatest fear?

Clowns. They are definitely not invited to my birthday party.

What is one word that best describes you?

Caring. I am always willing to help someone if they need it.

Read the full story here

 

For Shelby Bell Math is No. 1!

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Statistics with a minor in Computer Science, 2018 | College of Arts and Sciences | Hometown: Independence, Missouri

Why math?

I chose to study mathematics and statistics because I have always been really good at it and it is one of the only things I thoroughly enjoy doing on a daily basis.

What are the challenges and benefits of the math program?

Math is a very difficult subject in general, and that makes the program a challenge. However, the main challenge of the program for me has been trying to decide when to take certain math classes to prepare me for graduate school or other courses I need to take since some courses are only offered once a year and sometimes even less than that.

The main benefit of this program is that it teaches you to persevere. Studying math means you will fail and makes mistakes often. This program, and all the professors in it, teach you how to be a better student and more importantly, teach you to keep trying.

What do you admire most at UMKC?

The thing I admire most about UMKC is that they want everyone to succeed in what they do here. I admire this most because there are so many different places where students can go to receive help on challenging subjects. There is the math and science tutoring center in the library, the Supplemental Instruction program and so much more!

Are you a first-generation college student?

Yes, and being a first-generation college student means helping my family as much as I can. My dad and grandma worked so hard to get me whatever I needed when I was growing up even though we didn’t always have the money. My hope is that my degree will enable me to be able to take care of them someday.


Laila: Studying math has helped improve my problem-solving ability

Laila - Mathematics and Statistics

Why did you choose your major?

I love science and I wanted to go to med school; however, when my Calc III class conflicted with chemistry, I chose to study math. The Math Department is amazing. My professors are knowledgeable and love what they teach. I find math problems, especially proofs, more absorbing than anything else I’ve studied.

What will you take from your experience at UMKC into your professional career?

Studying math has helped improve my problem-solving ability. I’m not intimidated by problems because I can solve smaller pieces at a time. I’m also not as easily frustrated because I know sometimes you have to think about a problem many ways before you can solve it.

What do you love about UMKC?

UMKC surrounds the Linda Hall Library, which has many fantastic, old, original textbooks, including translations of works you can’t find on Google. I discovered the story of one of my favorite mathematicians, Thomas Harriot, at the library. He was an algebraist in the 17th century who never published his theory manuscripts. For over 300 years, scholars relied on a poor posthumous reckoning of his work until a scholar came along and accurately translated his work for the rest of the world.

 

Meet a Lucerna Author: Whitney White

My Lucerna project is about the Divergence Theorem, a famous mathematical theorem with common applications in the branch of physics. I analyze the 1831 proof of The Divergence Theorem and connect it to our modern understanding of it as printed in our textbooks. This original proof had not previously been translated into English and is first published here in this paper. I also hope to rightfully credit the theorem’s initial author, Michael Ostrogradsky. Though his theorem is commonplace, his name is not, and I believe he should be recognized.

Why are you interested in this topic?

I graduated from UMKC in December 2018, and I have a B.S. in Mathematics and a B.S. in Physics. These two fields are my passions, and The Divergence Theorem is used in both. The most incredible part of this project was getting my hands on the original historical document, in French, from 1832, at Linda Hall Library. I was floored to hold that history in my hands, and I was over the moon to learn that no translation existed. The history is incredible and being the first person to translate it makes me feel like I have a small part in this history as well.

What have been the benefits and challenges of this project?

I don’t speak French. Translating a very important piece of history from an unfamiliar language is scary and was the greatest challenge of my project. Of course, I did not want to disrespect or misrepresent the original work, so I had to be meticulous and accurate. I was lucky when my professor found a paper that translated common French mathematical terms into English. After completing the translation and connecting the original and modern proofs of The Divergence Theorem, I now better understand it. This more in-depth understanding of the logic behind each line of the proof is the greatest personal benefit of completing this project.

What is your advice for students who are interested in publishing their work in Lucerna?

A student hoping to publish in Lucerna should pick a novel topic that they find compelling. If you care about your research, it will show. It is also important to start your work early, compose multiple drafts, and ask for help in tearing them apart.

What are your professional plans or goals?

I plan to pursue a doctorate in Biostatistics at KU Medical Center beginning Fall of 2019. I will use that experience to pursue further research opportunities in the field of medical statistics. In my future work, I hope to continue to tie together past and present knowledge to spread new information.

Undergraduate Research Provides Rich Experiences

Student translates original 19th century manuscript to support research in mathematics

Whitney White, B.S. mathematics and physics, was excited to find that a historical document that she needed for her undergraduate research was available in its original form at the Linda Hall Library. She was undaunted by the fact that it had never been translated from its original French, even though she did not speak the language.

“I was floored to hold that history in my hands,” White said of the document, which was created in 1831. “And I was over the moon to learn that no translation existed. The history is incredible and being the first person to translate it makes me feel like I have a small part in this history as well.”

Mathematics and physics are White’s passion, and the Divergence Theorem is used in both.  Translating the theorem in an unfamiliar language was daunting, but she was undeterred. One of her professors provided a paper that translated common French mathematical terms into English.

“I did not want to misrepresent the original work, so I had to be meticulous and accurate,” White said.  “But after completing the translation and connecting the original and modern proofs of the Divergence Theorem, I now better understand it. This more in-depth understanding of the logic of the proof is the greatest personal benefit of completing this project.”

Henrietta Rix Wood, Ph. D., associate teaching professor at the Honors College, notes that this is why undergraduate research is important.

“Undergraduate research is a fun and rewarding way for students to develop important skills, such as posing questions and figuring out how to answer them, testing ideas and applying theories, and sharing their findings.”
Henrietta Rix Wood, Ph. D.

She also believes these skills extend beyond the university setting.

“As students contribute to scholarly conversations, they practice the important life skills of problem solving and persevering when things do not go as planned.”

White’s research was published in the latest issue of Lucerna, UMKC’s annual interdisciplinary journal of undergraduate research. Students are welcome to submit research papers written anytime during their academic careers at UMKC.

White says that students interested in being published in Lucerna should pick a novel topic that interests them.

“It‘s important to start your work early, compose multiple drafts and ask for help in tearing them apart,” White says. “If you care about your research, it will show.”

Wood, who is the current Lucerna faculty advisor, encourages students to submit their research.

“This process also is about the thrill of discovery, which Whitney felt when she learned that Linda Hall Library had a historical document that was crucial to her project. I think undergraduate research truly enhances a student’s learning experience.”

For further information, please visit https://honors.umkc.edu/get-involved/lucerna/

This entry was posted in UMKC Today

Student Testimonials

The ways we learn math and physics are so different. In math, the courses we take usually build on each other a lot. Arithmetic prepares you for algebra, which then prepares you for trigonometry and pre-calculus, which then prepares you for calculus and so on. I might be generalizing a little bit; this has just been my experience. Zoe Lemon,  (Physics Major with a Minor in Mathematics, 2017)

I chose a field of study that incorporated elements of public health, computer science and mathematics! – LeAnna Cates (Biology Major with a Minor in Mathematics, 2017)  The Interface of Biology and Mathematics Brings LeAnna An Outstanding Achievement! Read More

During my two years as a math major in the UMKC Department of Mathematics & Statistics, I have had the privilege of learning mathematics from some truly fantastic professors. The UMKC Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers a diverse selection of courses that seamlessly combine a rigorous introduction to the pure theory of mathematics without losing sight of its numerous applications. For example, I had the opportunity of participating in three group projects in an introductory linear algebra course that provided hands-on, problem-solving introductions to the applications of mathematics to the fields of computer science, economics, and ecology. This experience deepened my understanding of both the pure and the applied aspects of linear algebra and helped open my eyes to the incredible versatility and usefulness of mathematics in almost every modern field of study. I am very proud to be studying mathematics at UMKC!  David R. Ward, (Math Major, undergraduate, 2014)

It’s not easy going from a math class where you spend an hour thinking about one part of a proof, to a biology class where you cover over 100 pages of the textbook in only 50 minutes. But these challenges have provided great opportunities. Not only in developing diverse problem-solving skills, I can also clearly see how these two departments can work together to solve problems. This summer I am excited to begin my own research, studying modeling and analysis of probiotics.  Megan Oldroyd IPhD student (Primary discipline: mathematics Co-discipline: cell biology and biophysics, 2015)

I love  working at Center High School. I ended up substitute teaching in the Learning Lab at Center for the remainder of the 2011-2012 school year, and got hired on full time for the current school year.  So I started off  grad school teaching 2 sections of College Algebra at UMKC, taking two grad level classes, and working full-time.  And on top of that, I was the new grader for the VSI program at UMKC.  Needless to say, I had no time to do my school work, and ended up having to leave Center in January.  Since then, I have been substitute teaching on semester breaks, and again at the end of the current school year. I adore the students at Center and I try to keep in contact with the school in hopes that I can teach there once I finish grad school. Kris Kathman, (Master’s Student, Aug 2013)

As a non-traditional undergraduate student with a full-time job and family, I’ve been very pleased with how understanding and helpful all of my professors have been. I love how diverse the faculty is, both in background and place of origin. I appreciate opportunities I’ve been given to get hands on with applications and software such as Matlab in class. I would actually like to see even more applications, perhaps in collaboration with the Physics, Computer Science, or Geosciences departments. Upon returning to college, my intention was originally to just get my B.S. to help me advance in my career as a business analyst, but after my time with the UMKC math program I’ve decided to continue my studies, most likely in Statistics or Applied Mathematics. Nathan W. Gearhart (Math Major, 2014)

I am pursuing a dual major degree in Computer Science and Physics which involves taking several courses in mathematics. Without mathematics neither of my degree choices would be possible. Taking mathematics courses has allowed me to discover various mathematical applications that apply to my area of study. I hope to one day further develop both areas of studies through the use of skills obtained from mathematical courses. William J. Freeman, (UMKC-Student, 2014)

 

1st Annual UMKC Math & Stat Research Day

Date: Friday, April 24, 2015
Time: 10:00am-3:00pm
Location: Royall Hall 211

The Math & Stats Research Day provides a platform for students and faculty to publicly present their research and scholarly activities in mathematics, statistics, and their applications in various fields. This event is open to all students (undergraduate and graduate), faculty, and staff. In a broad context, we are interested in research projects that employ some mathematical or statistical methods. This is opportunity to present your scholarly work and to network with mathematics and statistics researchers at UMKC.  

 

Time/ Talk / Speaker

10:00-10:20 The first statement of the formula for the Normal Curve, Andres F. Cantillo
10:20-10:50 A Measuring Argument for Finite Groups, Joseph LeRoy
10:50-11:20 Prediction for the Percentage Score in an Introductory Math Course of Freshmen at a University in the Southwestern United States, Xia Xing
11:20-11:35 A Mathematical Model of Oral Probiotic and Indigenous Bacterial Ecology Within the Canine Digestive Tract, Tyler W. Brown,
11:35-11:50 The Problem of Points, Andres F. Cantillo
11:50-12:20 Time Series Analysis for S&P 500, Mansour Alghamdi
12:20-1:00 Lunch (Provided by UMKC ASA Student Chapter)
1:00-1:30 Apple Stock Price Model Building and Forecasting Using Time Series Analysis, Kamel A. Alanazi
1:30-2:00 Ideal Treatments for HIV-TB Co-Infected populations: Modeling and Optimal Control Theory Perspectives, Abhishek Mallela
2:00-2:20 Dynamics of hemorrhagic disease in Missouri white-tailed deer population, Evan M. Kraviec
2:20-2:40 Seasonal dynamics of hemorrhagic disease in Missouri white-tailed deer population, David Joung
2:40-3:00 Simulating contact mechanics of an anatomical elbow joint, Munsur Rahman

Abstracts

 

1. The first statement of the formula for the Normal Curve

Andres F. Cantillo, afc7dc@mail.umkc.edu Department of Economics

De Moivre’s book “The Doctrine of Chances” (2) is thorough account of what was known about probability and annuities. The proof that is the object of this paper is included in the very last pages of the book (pages 235-243). The aim of the present paper is to explicate De Moivre’s first part of the proof in such a way that we can trace back the reasoning behind this creation has shaped the modern way of doing science.

2. A Measuring Argument for Finite Groups

Joseph M. Leroy, leroym@umkc.edu Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Studying the structure of groups is a large field, and counting formulas help in understanding the structure of groups.  We will look at an important counting argument that can be used toward this end. 

3. Prediction for the Percentage Score in an Introductory Math Course of Freshmen at a University in the Southwestern United States

Xing Xia, xx8pf@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mathematics and Statistics

This study has shown the model of prediction about the percentage score and the corresponding letter grade based on four factors: Gender, High School GPA, Entrance Examination Score, and Race. The study is based on grade data for a certain academic year from over 810 students enrolled in an introductory math course. Success was defined as obtaining a B or higher grade in this course.

Using data from a first-year introductory math course, it was found that the white, female students outperformed other subgroup students. The entrance examination score had the biggest correlation to the overall percentage earned in the course. That makes entrance examination scores a very important factor to consider when admitting students that are entering the undergraduate program, even more important than high school GPA. 

 4. A Mathematical Model of Oral Probiotic and Indigenous Bacterial Ecology Within the Canine Digestive Tract

Tyler W. Brown, twbfyb@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering

The focus of our research was to mathematically and numerically analyze the effects of probiotic supplementation when administered to dogs.  We took data previously collected by Texas A&M Veterinary School and analyzed it to see how oral probiotics affected indigenous bacterial cultures and vice versa.  Our original model was derived from the Lotka-Volterra competition model, but it was modified to take into account for the probiotic administration. Using the linear stability analysis of the model, we established the conditions for the coexistence of the probiotic with other bacteria native to the gut.  This also yielded the finding that coexistence during supplementation can be achieved in either node or spiral form.  By fitting the model to the data we calculated the changes in the level of competition during, before and after the probiotic administration. Our results confirmed prior studies which show that once probiotic supplementation is discontinued, the probiotic population within the digestive tract diminishes. 

5. The Problem of Points

Andres F. Cantillo, afc7dc@mail.umkc.edu Department of Economics

According to Katz some of the basic notions of probability existed in ancient civilizations. In The Talmud and in Roman calculations of annuities there is some evidence of this. However, no record of numerical probability calculations exists. Hald, Bernstein and Katz agree that this numerical development was intimately linked to the study of gambling, contracts and profits. These authors also coincide in that the formulation of “The Problem of Points” is a crucial event. The paper is centered on evaluating and explaining the history of the formulation of “The Problem of Points”. The solution to this problem originated the deductive notions of probability. I will center my attention on the formulation and attempt of solution by Pacioli, Cardano, Tartaglia and Forestani. In this process Cardano began to unveil some principles that are coherent with a modern theory of probability.

 

6. Time Series Analysis for S&P 500

 Mansour Alghamdi, maarn8@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mathematics and Statistics

We use time series analysis to give information about an American stock market index and predict the index values in future. The presentation contains basic statistical inference about mean, variance, skewness and Kurtosis. We employ different time series models  such as AR, MA, ARMA, ARCH, ARCH, GARCH and APARCH models and we conduct Model selection via AIC and BIC.

 

7. Apple Stock Price Model Building and Forecasting Using Time Series Analysis

Kamel A. Alanazi, kaarmf@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Time series analysis is the most common method of stock price forecasting, so we use it to perform this mission. We get Apple stock price data from Yahoo finance website. We present summary statistics of log returns, and related statistical inference. We estimate different time series model such as AR, MR, ARMA, ARCH, GARCH, and APARCH and use AIC and BIC for model selection.

 

8. Ideal Treatments for HIV-TB Co-Infected populations: Modeling and Optimal Control Theory Perspectives

Abhishek Mallela, abhishek.mallela@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mathematics and Statistics

HIV­TB co­infected individuals undergoing TB treatment often face the dilemma of initiating HIV treatment either immediately or after the TB treatment course is complete. Initiating HIV treatment early during the TB treatment course has advantages such as fewer AIDS­related deaths and a lower risk of HIV transmission as well as disadvantages such as Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) and complications arising from a high pill burden. Here, we develop a mathematical model to explore the effects of early and late HIV treatment initiation on new HIV infections, AIDS-related deaths, and new IRIS cases/complications. We identify that the minimum burden that can be achieved with these treatments depends on both the strength and the timing of initiation of HIV treatment. Thus, we also formulate an optimal control problem based on our model, and determine ideal HIV­TB treatment protocols for these co­infected populations.

9. Dynamics of Hemorrhagic disease in Missouri white-tailed deer population

Evan M. Kraviec, emkfyb@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Hemorrhagic disease (HD) is primarily transmitted by a biting midge in the genus Culicoides. Over the past 30 years, there have been four major HD outbreaks in the population of white-tailed deer residing in Missouri. We construct a mathematical model consisting of two Susceptible-Infected sub-models, which represent the disease dynamics in deer and midge populations. Using the mathematical model we study the HD outbreaks and make recommendations to reduce and control HD in Missouri. Specifically, the numerical simulations of the model indicate that reducing the contact between midges and deer can significantly decrease the prevalence of HD. The linear stability analysis of the model provides the specific conditions for possible eradication of HD in the Missouri white-tailed deer population. 

 10. Seasonal Dynamics of Hemorrhagic disease in Missouri white-tailed deer population

David Joung, dj334@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Hemorrhagic disease (HD) is primarily transmitted by a biting midge in the genus Culicoides. We construct a mathematical model consisting of two Susceptible-Infected sub-models, which represent the disease dynamics in deer and midges populations. With population of midges grows as temperature rises and during winter they are in their pupa form which stays in the water, so we decided to use seasonal forcing in our model. By adding seasonal forcing term on number of birth of midges throughout the years and run simulations, we have better understanding on seasonal effect on HD and how to reduce the contact between midges and deer by decrease the population of midges. 

11. Simulating contact mechanics of an anatomical elbow joint

Munsur Rahman, mmrhwb@mail.umkc.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering

The elbow joint, recognized as the most important joint of the upper extremity serves as a fulcrum for the forearm. However, this important joint is the most commonly dislocated joint for children and second most commonly dislocated joint for adults. Computational musculoskeletal models of the elbow joint that are capable of simultaneous and accurate predictions of muscle and ligament forces, along with cartilage contact mechanics can be an immensely useful tool in clinical practice. As a step towards producing a musculoskeletal model, the goal of our current research is to develop a subject-specific multibody models of the elbow joint that represent humerus cartilage as discrete rigid bodies that interact with the radius and ulna cartilages through deformable contacts. The contact parameters of the compliant contact law were derived using simplified elastic foundation contact theory. The models were then validated by placing the model in a virtual mechanical tester for a motion profile similar to a cadaver experiment, and the resulting kinematics were compared. The maximum RMS error between the predicted and measured kinematics during the complete testing cycle was 2.7mm medial-lateral translation and 5.50 varus-valgus rotation of radius relative to humerus. After the successful model validation, lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) deficient conditions were simulated and, contact pressures and kinematics were compared to the intact elbow model. A significant difference in medial-lateral displacement and varus-valgus rotation were observed for LUCL deficient condition. A small difference in contact area and contact magnitude were also observed for LUCL deficiency in the model.

 

Back to Applied Mathematics Group Activities

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    Syed E. Hasan Receives Fulbright Award

    Syed E. Hasan, Ph.D., UMKC geosciences professor emeritus, has been awarded a Fulbright award to Qatar by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board (FFSB). Hasan will teach courses in waste management and environmental geology at Qatar University, and offer seminars at other Middle East universities, during the 2016 spring semester

    “Qatar, with its unique marine and desert ecosystems, needs to implement a waste management strategy that is compatible with its natural environment,” Hasan said. “I am looking forward to sharing my expertise in the field of waste management with students and faculty at Qatar University to help them develop a sound waste management plan for their country.”

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    UMKC collection offers trip way, way back in time

    KMBC News 9’s Joel Nichols visits the UMKC campus to tell the story of a man’s (Professor Gentile) lifetime love of our areas underground history.

    https://youtu.be/XJvXiVgqWqs

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    UMKC Galaxy Evolution Group Assists with Planned Observations with Next Great Space Observatory

    UMKC Galaxy Evolution GroupThe James Webb Space Telescope, the scientific successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to launch in the spring of 2020. It is expected to make history as the largest astronomical observatory ever sent into space, and University of Missouri-Kansas City scientists and students will be among those getting the earliest access to it.

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    UMKC Geosciences Graduate Student Interns at NASA

    Forrest Black, a Graduate Research Assistant in the Department of Geosciences, spent this past fall semester interning at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

    As an intern, Black helped develop a tool that can ingest standard weather data and flight trajectory data for analyzing the impact of weather on aviation operations. He will stay in Virginia to work on this project throughout the spring 2017 semester.

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    UMKC professor recognized by NASA for work on galaxies

    Mark Brodwin, UMKC Physics and Astronomy Professor A UMKC professor has been recognized for his work studying galaxies.

    Mark Brodwin, associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, won a NASA Group Achievement Award from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

    Brodwin was one of six recognized for groundbreaking research as part of the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) Survey team, called MaDCoWS, for short.

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    UMKC research team receives award for device that may help prevent a nuclear attack

    caruso

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A new tool may soon help the U.S. military stop a nuclear attack, and it was made in Kansas City.

    For the past 8 years, UMKC physics professor, Anthony Caruso, has led a research team of students and professors from UMKC, K-State and University of Missouri – Columbia to develop a new way to find radiation.

    “There’s just not that many options available because there are so many containers and it’s so easy to hide special nuclear material on one of these container ships,” said Caruso.

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    UMKC to Present Honorary Doctorates to Outstanding Kansas City-Based Authors

    Dean Wayne Vaught speaks to a faculty member at UMKC commencement in 2016Celebrated Kansas City-based non-fiction authors David Von Drehle and Candice Millard will be honored with honorary doctorates at mid-year commencement ceremonies Dec. 16 at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

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    VFW puts more “ease” into UMKC’s At Ease Zone

    Lynn Roth, III, Nick Lopez and Ethan Alexander pose for a photo on the new couch in the UMKC At Ease ZoneThe National Headquarters of the Veterans of Foreign Wars has put a little more “ease” into the UMKC At Ease Zone. The VFW recently presented student veterans with a much-desired couch for the space, along with a new coffee maker and a networked printer.

    The UMKC At Ease Zone, located on the second floor of Cherry Hall on UMKC’s Volker Campus, supports UMKC student veterans as they transition into community and campus life. The At Ease Zone is a collaboration between the College of Arts and Sciences’ School of Social Work and the UMKC Dean of Students.

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Research

Faculty Research

Our faculty members have diverse research interests including topics in statistics, applied mathematics and pure mathematics. Our department also hosts Colloquium series by inviting speakers to discuss and present their research. Learn more about our Faculty Research

The UMKC Applied Mathematics Group is a research group within the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at University of Missouri-Kansas City. The applied mathematics group has interdisciplinary research interests in the areas of mathematical biology, scientific computations, applied analysis, and numerical linear algebra. See the Applied Mathematics Group Activities.

 

            

 

 

Internal Scholarships and Grants

Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunity (SUROP) Grant

Grant Amount: up to $3,250. Application Deadline: March of the year
Undergraduate researchers can apply for a grant of up to $1,250 to cover expenses related to research, scholarship, or creative work to be carried during summer. Additionally, funded undergraduate researchers will receive a $2,000 tuition credit in their financial aid accounts. Faculty mentors will receive a $1,000 honorarium for serving in this vital role during the summer months.

Students Engaged in Artistic and Academic Research (SEARCH) Grant

Grant Amount: up to $1,250. Application Deadline: September of the year
SEARCH provides a venue for presentation and recognition of undergraduate research efforts in all disciplines at UMKC. For more information please visit the website of UMKC SEARCH.

Jedel Scholarship

Scholarship Amount: $2,000 per semester (Maximum of $24,000)

Application Deadline: October-March of the year (Click here to apply).

Qualifications: Students majoring in Math. Preference given to students with a combination of financial need and historical academic performance at UMKC. The fund will award 3 x $4,000 scholarships per Academic Year ($2,000 per semester, for a total of $24,000)

UMKC Scholarships

Scholarship Amount: varies. Application Deadline: January-February of the year
Each year, UMKC awards more than $200 million in financial aid. There are three major categories of scholarships at UMKC – Automatic, Competitive and Academic Unit (program of study). For more information please visit the website of UMKC Financial Aid and Scholarships.

External Scholarships and Grants

The Science, Mathematics And Research for Transformation (SMART)

The SMART Scholarship was established by the Department of Defense to support undergraduate and graduate students pursuing degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program

REU supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. Applicants should note that most application deadlines fall in February – March.

AMS Graduate Student Travel Grants

The travel grants are available each year for the Joint Mathematics Meetings and the Sectional Mathematics Meetings.

MAA Student Travel Grant

The MAA, with funding from the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences, provides limited funding to support student travel to our annual meetings.

ASA Scholarships

The ASA administers or supports several scholarships and awards each year. These include the Edward C. Bryant Scholarship Trust Fund Scholarship, Lingzi Lu Memorial Award, and Gertrude M. Cox Scholarship.

NSF-AWM Travel Grants for Women

The Association for Women in Mathematics has administered the NSF-AWM Travel Grant Program for Women since 1988, supporting both travel to domestic or foreign research conferences and, more recently, longer-term visits with a mentor.

 

Statistics Fast Track Program

Overview

This program offers students an opportunity to meet the full requirements of the BS and MS in a shorter time period than the separate degree programs. The students may complete a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Statistics in four years and the Master’s degree in Statistics  the fifth year. Fast-track students may also apply for graduate teaching assistant (GTA) positions, by filling out the GTA Application Form.

Admission Requirements

  1. The applicant must be a UMKC undergraduate student who has completed a minimum of 60 cumulative credit hours (preferably between 60 to 90 credit hours).
  2. The applicant should complete the BS/MS application form and submit it to both the undergraduate and graduate advisors as listed on Academic Advising page.
  3. The following courses must be completed satisfactorily.
    1.  Math 300: Linear Algebra I
    2.  Math 301: On Solid Ground: Sets and Proof, or any 400 level class that has Math 301 as a prerequisite. For instance, Math 410, Math 420 or Math 402.
  4. A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 is required.
  5. A minimum GPA of 3.2 in Math/Stat courses is required.

B.S. Degree Requirements (total of 33 credit hours)

As listed below, there are 24 credit hours required undergraduate courses.

  • Math 210: Calculus I
  • Math 220: Calculus II
  • Math 250: Calculus III
  • Math 300: Linear Algebra I
  • Math 402: Advanced Analysis I
  • Math 410: Modern Algebra, or Math 420: Linear Algebra II
  • Stat 441: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics II

The student should also take at least 9 credit hours of Math or Stat elective courses at the 400- level or above.

M.S. Degree Requirements (total of 30 credit hours)

The following core courses are required for the completion of the M.S. degree:

  • Stat 5501 Statistical Design of Experiments
  • Stat 5537 Mathematical Statistics I
  • Stat 5547 Mathematical Statistics II
  • Stat 5551 Applied Statistical Analysis
  • Stat 5565 Regression Analysis
  • Stat 5572 Multivariate Analysis

Also a total of 12 Credit hours of Math or Stat elective courses at the 400-level or above must be completed satisfactorily.

B.S./M.S. Degree Overlap (up to 9 credit hours)

Up to 9 credit hours of 400-level Math or Stat courses in the graduate degree can overlap with the courses taken towards satisfying the requirements for the undergraduate degree.

Student Research

Students are welcome to work with the department faculty on projects related to Mathematics or Statistics. There are also funding opportunities available to support student research. The UMKC Mathematics & Statistics Graduate Student Organization organizes the graduate seminar series every semester. The graduate students present their research on different areas of mathematics and statistics. Some of their work is also presented in the math & stat research day.  The undergraduate students have a good reputation in publishing several undergraduate papers and presenting their work in undergraduate conferences such as the UMKC SEARCH Symposium.

More about Undergraduate research

 

Undergraduate Programs

Overview

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers coursework leading to the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degrees. Applicants are expected to meet the general requirements for admission to UMKC. See the General Admission Information section of the UMKC catalog.

Degree Options

As listed below, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics provides a variety of degree options.

Mathematics and Statistics B.S.

The B.S. in Mathematics and Statistics is suitable for students who may attend graduate school in mathematics or statistics.  The B.S. has more mathematics course requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes and Degree Requirements

Mathematics and Statistics B.A.

The B.A. in mathematics is suitable for students who are interested in a liberal arts degree. The B.A. has fewer mathematics course requirements and more non-science and foreign-language courses.

Student Learning Outcomes and Degree Requirements

Mathematics Minor

If your major is in disciplines such as Physics, Education, Chemistry or Engineering, you might be very close to getting a minor in mathematics. Here is how it works:  Fill out the  Declaration of Major/Minor Form, get the advisor’s signature (Dr. Bani-Yaghoub baniyaghoubm@umkc.edu), and forward it to the Registrar’s Office.

Student Learning Outcomes and Requirements for Math Minor

Minor in Actuarial Science

The Minor in Actuarial Science prepares you for an actuary career. This minor is suitable for students majoring in Mathematics and Statistics, Business, Economics, Accounting and the related fields. Here is how it works:  Fill out the  Declaration of Major/Minor Form, get get the advisor’s signature (Dr. Bani-Yaghoub baniyaghoubm@umkc.edu) , and forward it to the Registrar’s Office. Read More

Double Major

A double major may be earned when a student completes two or more full majors, generally within the 120 hours required for a single degree. The two most popular double majors that our students pursue are Physics and Chemistry.

Double Degree

A double degree may be earned when a student completes a minimum of 150 hours, completing the general education and major requirements for each of two majors. Students who earn a double degree will receive two diplomas simultaneously. Some students are interested in Mathematics and Computer Science second degree.

Why Mathematics and Statistics?

Daiwa Emmert recently graduated with latin honors with a degree in education and the subject matter expertise in Mathematics & Statistics. She was also a successful student athlete at UMKC.

We invite you to read the Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey. These are stories of barriers that people face in the mathematics pipeline, and how perseverance and persistence garnered success. These stories  will inspire you to persist on the road to becoming a successful mathematician.

The faculty members in our department care about the success of the students and try their best to help them reach their career goals. Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics are among the top 15 college majors that are the most valuable in terms of salary and career prospects (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics).

There are many career opportunities (from www.maa.org):


Career Job title Company
Academia & Teaching Instructor, Teacher, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Lecturer Different Universities and Schools
Actuarial Science & Accounting Consulting Actuary, Senior Budget Analyst, Accounting Supervisor, Actuarial Analyst Plante & Moran, PLLC Buck Consultants, Joan Ogden Actuaries, Department of the Navy, Credit Union, Allstate Insurance
Business Management Quality Control Manager, Director of Inventory Control, Project Manager, Financial Officer Northwest Airlines, Hewlett-Packard, Biles & Associates, Target Corporation, L.L. Bean, Optimal Solutions
Computing Modeling and Simulation Analyst, Imaging Scientist, Electronic Commerce Specialist, Java Developer Dynamic Research Corporation, Sandia National Laboratories Daniel H. Wagner Associates Microsoft Games Studios
Engineering Associate Engineer, Staff Engineer, Systems Engineer, Consultant Mask House, IBM, Costal Engineering Consultants, AT&T Bell Laboratories
Investment Analysis Commercial Analyst, Risk Analyst The Americas Marathon Oil Company, Equifax, Travelers Insurance
Medicine & Life Sciences Biostatistician, Research associate, Bio-mathematician, Consultant Hoffmann La Roche Pharmaceutical Proctor and Gamble, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Military & Public Service Consultant, Program Manager, Agricultural Economist, Property Management Specialist Price Waterhouse, US Navy, Naval Surface Warfare Center, US Dept. of Agriculture, Defense Contract Management Agency
Sales & Marketing Educational Markets Manager, Marketing and Sales Consultant ZS Associates , Texas Instruments

Career Descriptions