Undergraduate History Courses

Please note: The current class schedule, with class times and locations, is available in Pathway, the university’s online registration system.

Spring 2021

HISTORY 101 U.S. History to 1877

Through lectures, readings, and class discussions, students in this course will learn about the early formation of the colonies, the American Revolution, the National Period, slavery, territorial expansion, and the beginnings of industrialization. The clash of cultures that produced the United States and subsequently affected its development will be emphasized. The course will close by examining the Civil War that nearly destroyed the republic and the attempts to mend the nation’s wounds afterwards. This class will explore a wide variety of historical readings and perspectives encompassing political, economic, social, cultural, racial, military, diplomatic, and gender-related issues.

HISTORY 102 U.S. History Since 1877

Through lectures, readings, and class discussions, students in this course will learn about industrialization, western migration, imperialism, progressivism, world wars, depression, the cold war, and the emergence of the equal rights movements. The course will close with an examination of the United States on the world stage and the emerging war on terror in the wake of September 11th. This class will explore a wide variety of historical readings and perspectives encompassing political, economic, social, cultural, racial, military, diplomatic, and gender-related issues.

HISTORY 202 European History since 1600 

This course surveys the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from about 1600 to the present. Emphasis is given to themes of continuity and change in European culture through the experience of political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; conservative reactions; liberal reforms; nation building; imperialism; two world wars; fascism; communism; and the Cold War.

Instructor: This course will be taught online in the first eight-week session (1/19/2021-3/12/2021) by Dr. David Freeman.

HISTORY 206 World History To 1450

This course surveys the cultural, social, economic, and political history of the world to 1450. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Massimiliano Vitiello.

HISTORY 215 Getting High: Alcohol & Drugs in American History

This class will investigate historical transformations in how American society has defined and responded to problematic drinking and drug use. The class will analyze what controversies surrounding various forms of intoxication indicate about the nature of American society and culture.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Matthew Osborn.

HISTORY 300HW Special Topics in World History

Topic: Jewish History
This Jewish History course will center on the Jewish experience in America, but it also will have a transnational focus. The course will consider where immigrant Jews in America have historically emigrated from and why, how immigrant Jews remained attached to their former homelands, the growth of American Jewish involvement in international Jewish affairs, the constantly evolving relationship between American Jews and the State of Israel, and how American Jews imagined America as exceptional at times and as unexceptional at other times.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Professor Matthew Brittingham.

HISTORY 300US Special Topics in United States History

Topic: US Foreign Policy and Military History
This course surveys the development of American land, sea, air, space, and cyber power from the start of the colonial era to the present, with an emphasis on the interrelationship between U.S. foreign and military policies and between diplomacy and force.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Kevin Fernlund, Professor of History at University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*This is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 300US through Pathway but will be taught by Dr. Fernlund via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 300US Special Topics in United States History

Topic: U.S. Immigration: 1790 to the 21st Century
This course examines the history of free and forced newcomers to the U.S. and the laws that shaped their ability to immigrate. It looks at the conditions that newcomers faced and their subsequent struggles for political, social, and economic rights and freedoms. It explores the legal foundations that grounded the admission of certain newcomers and the exclusion or marginalization of others.

Instructor: This second eight-week course will be taught online by Dr. Deborah Cohen, Professor of History at University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*This is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 300US through Pathway but will be taught by Dr. Cohen via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 300US Special Topics in United States History

Topic: Baseball and the Making of Modern America
This course uses the lens of baseball to aid in the development of a deeper understanding of the United States. It explores how social, cultural, economic, and political forces shaping the U.S. after the Civil War were reflected in the national past time. In the study of key trends and events in baseball history, students will learn how broader themes in U.S. history, such as industrialization and urbanization, race and ethnicity, imperialism, war, gender, and business impacted and were influenced by the sport.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Laura Westhoff, Professor of History at University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*This is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 300US through Pathway but will be taught by Dr. Westhoff via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 301WI Historiography and Method

All history majors must take this course, ideally at the beginning of their junior year. Its content includes: 1) what history is; 2) its value and usefulness; 3) the diversity of historical fields, approaches, and methods; and 4) the techniques of preparing and writing history papers.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Massimiliano Vitiello.

HISTORY 302 Colonial North America, 1492–1763

This course examines European colonization in North America, from the voyage of Christopher Columbus to the eve of the American Revolution. Students will consider the Atlantic-world context of colonization, the environmental factors that shaped colonial development, and the complex interactions of European, African, and Indian peoples.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Matthew Osborn.

HISTORY 307A History of Christianity from the Middles Ages to Present

This course examines the cultural, historical and theological development of Christianity from the High Middle Ages to the present. The main themes follow the development of foundational Christian theological thought and practice into what are now mainstream Western Christian theologies, the institutional histories of Western Christianity, and the cultures of Western civilization.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. David Freeman.

HISTORY 309 World War II Film and Propaganda

This course examines film and propaganda, including posters, political cartoons, speeches, and other media, created in prewar or wartime conditions by both the Allies and Axis powers from 1933 to 1945 as it affected World War II.

Instructor: This course will be taught in a blended instruction mode by Dr. Rebecca Davis.

HISTORY 334 History of Technology

The course examines technology as it shapes and is shaped by human society. Students will consider technology as a product of historically-specific and sometimes overlapping contexts shaped by culture, economics, natural environments, and social processes.

Instructor: This course will be taught online in the first eight-week session (1/19/2021-3/12/2021) by Dr. Brian Frehner.

HISTORY 343 Oral History

This course focuses on the methods, theories, ethics, practices, and applications of tools in documenting and recovering the experiences of people hidden from the “traditional records.” Through lectures, readings, discussions, and fieldwork, students will learn the various steps in developing a robust oral history project. Students will go out into the community to capture the histories of communities in Kansas City.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. Sandra Enríquez.

HISTORY 369 Women and Work in Early America

This course examines the ways in which gender, race, region, and class have shaped the historical experiences of American women. Students will trace women’s lives from pre-European contact to 1877 through an examination of a wide variety of social, cultural, economic, and political forces and factors.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Diane Mutti Burke.

HISTORY 407 Latin American Crises and Opportunities

This course studies why Latin America has experienced in the 20th and 21st centuries recurrent economic and political crises – and why it is still a land of enormous opportunity. While this is primarily a history course, it undertakes a multidisciplinary examination of the region’s strengths and weaknesses by discussing theories of economic development, political and sociological models as well as the influence of crime and violence. Case studies anchored in representative countries will be used to illustrate historical trends and theories.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Viviana Grieco.

HISTORY 411B Medieval Civilization II

This course covers the medieval world from about 900 to about 1500, including in the notion of “medieval world” not just the regions of western Europe, but the areas encompassed by the Byzantine Empire, the central and eastern European Slavo-Russian kingdoms, and the regions controlled by Islamic caliphates and emirates. Although attention will be paid to all regions in a general way, however, the notion of a “medieval” era is primarily a western one, and so much of the emphasis during the semester will be on western Europe and the British Isles.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Linda Mitchell.

HISTORY 416R The French Revolution and Napoleon

Narrative history concentrating on the explosive and colorful events and personalities in France, but also showing the European and Western context and impact of the revolution and Napoleon. Illustrated accounts cover such “great days” as the storming of the Bastille, the fall of Robespierre, and Napoleon’s Coup of 18 Brumaire, and great battles. Main periods are: the origins of the revolution (economic, social, political, intellectual); revolution and reconstruction (1789-92); through terror to Thermidor (Jacobins and sans-culottes); Napoleon’s wars and reconstruction (France and Europe). Cinema, slides and martial music periodically. Discussion of major authors and interpretations.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. David Freeman.

HISTORY 430RA ‘We Are The Dead’: The Great War Experience Through its Artifacts

World War One was the “war to end all wars”; all previous wars were indeed eclipsed by its scale of destruction. And yet, it was a war that initiated a century of continual bloodshed and crimes against humanity. This course will explore the causes, nature and consquences of the Great War of 1914-18. It will be taught on different themes each Winter semester at the National World War One Memorial Museum at Liberty Memorial.

Instructor: This course will be taught in a blended instruction mode by Dr. Andrew Bergerson.

HISTORY 431R Medieval England, 1066 To 1485

Beginning with the Norman conquest of England in 1066, this course traces the history of Medieval England through the establishment of the Tudor dynasty. Covered will be such items as the rise of the Angevin Empire, the conflict between monarch & nobility, the evolution of Parliament, as well as the Anglo-French rivalry which culminated in the Hundred Years’ War.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Linda Mitchell.

HISTORY 472 Ancient Rome

This course covers Roman history from its origins (including the Etruscans) to the decline of the imperial system. Particular emphasis is placed upon the political, social and economic developments in the Republic, the death of the Republic, the early Principate, and the factors that led to Rome’s decline in the ancient world.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. Massimiliano Vitiello.

HISTORY 498WI Senior Capstone

This is the capstone course in the department and is required for majors in the senior year. It consists of tutorial sessions with a regular faculty member and independent research leading to a major paper using original source materials. Performance in this course will weigh heavily in the award of departmental honors.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Diane Mutti Burke.

Fall 2020

HISTORY 101 U.S. History to 1877

Through lectures, readings, and class discussions, students in this course will learn about the early formation of the colonies, the American Revolution, the National Period, slavery, territorial expansion, and the beginnings of industrialization. The clash of cultures that produced the United States and subsequently affected its development will be emphasized. The course will close by examining the Civil War that nearly destroyed the republic and the attempts to mend the nation’s wounds afterwards. This class will explore a wide variety of historical readings and perspectives encompassing political, economic, social, cultural, racial, military, diplomatic, and gender-related issues.

HISTORY 102 U.S. History Since 1877

Through lectures, readings, and class discussions, students in this course will learn about industrialization, western migration, imperialism, progressivism, world wars, depression, the cold war, and the emergence of the equal rights movements. The course will close with an examination of the United States on the world stage and the emerging war on terror in the wake of September 11th. This class will explore a wide variety of historical readings and perspectives encompassing political, economic, social, cultural, racial, military, diplomatic, and gender-related issues.

HISTORY 202 – European History since 1600 

This course surveys the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from about 1600 to the present. Emphasis is given to themes of continuity and change in European culture through the experience of political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; conservative reactions; liberal reforms; nation building; imperialism; two world wars; fascism; communism; and the Cold War.

Instructor: This course will be taught online in the second eight-week session (10/19/2020-12/18/2020) by Dr. David Freeman.

HISTORY 206 World History To 1450

This course surveys the cultural, social, economic, and political history of the world to 1450. It studies the development of civilizations in isolation as well as the origins, nature, and consequences of global forms of interaction and exchange.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. Massimiliano Vitiello.

HISTORY 208 World History since 1450

This introductory course in modern world history focuses on the period from 1450 to the present. It explores themes of global interactions and exchange in terms of economic, social, political, and cultural history. Students will learn about the global past through both secondary and primary sources, and they will learn how to write informed, historical interpretations about that past as a foundation for more advanced work in history and related disciplines.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Bergerson.

HISTORY 300HW Special Topics in World History

Topic: Modern Africa: From Colonies to Nations
This course uses film, fiction, music, and historical sources to explore the history of twentieth century Africa, focusing on African experiences of the colonial and postcolonial periods.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Kara Moskowitz, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*This is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 300HW through Pathway but will be taught by Dr. Moskowitz via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 300HW Special Topics in World History

Topic: Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present
An introduction to the humanities, social science, and science disciplines through a sweeping overview of natural and human history from the Big Bang to the present. Course will include lectures from faculty in various Arts and Sciences units, films, and group discussions.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Kevin Fernlund, Professor of History at University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*This is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 300HW through Pathway but will be taught by Dr. Fernlund via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 300HW Special Topics in World History

Topic: War and Violence in Modern Times
This course examines the connections between warfare and resistance, gangs and poverty, and state and non-state officials as enactors of violence. It explores the effects of war and violence on the poor in Brazil and the United States, prisoners of war in Asia, and resistance fighters in Latin America and northern Africa. Students will watch films/short videos, read academic and newspaper articles, and listen to short podcasts to grapple with the issues underlying structures of violence.

Instructor: This second eight-week course will be taught online by Dr. Deborah Cohen, Professor of History at University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*This is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 300HW through Pathway but will be taught by Dr. Cohen via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 300PH Special Topics in Public History

Topic: Digital Humanities
In this course, we will introduce fundamental concepts and practical skills in the digital humanities with a particular focus on the quantitative analysis of literary and linguistic features in texts and also the annotation of features such as named entities and geographic locations to help visualize texts and textual collections. In the class, we will work collaboratively with many different literary works and students will also have the opportunity to work with texts of their choice. Although most of the work in this class will be computational, it does not require prior experience with coding or markup.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox.

HISTORY 300RI Special Studies/WGS 301 Introduction to Feminist Theory

This course covers a wide variety of feminist theories and theoretical perspectives, primarily since the 1960s, and is devoted to understanding and evaluating this body of work and the insights and possibilities for change that it suggests.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Brenda Bethman.

HISTORY 301WI Historiography and Method

All history majors must take this course, ideally at the beginning of their junior year. Its content includes: 1) what history is; 2) its value and usefulness; 3) the diversity of historical fields, approaches, and methods; and 4) the techniques of preparing and writing history papers.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. Matthew Osborn.

HISTORY 303 The American Revolution, 1763-1789 

This course examines the history of the American Revolution, from the explosive political crisis of the 1760s to the struggle over ratification of the Constitution. Students will consider the origins and conduct of the war, as well as the Revolution’s far-reaching political, social, and economic consequences.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Matthew Osborn.

HISTORY 306A History of Christianity to the Middle Ages

This course examines the cultural, historical, and theological development of Christianity from its origins to the High Middle Ages. The main themes follow the mechanisms and conditions shaping Christianity’s expansion into a major cultural, social, institutional, and intellectual force in Western Europe with a focus on patterns of crisis and reform.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. David Freeman.

HISTORY 348 Missouri/Kansas Border Wars

This course explores the history of the Civil War on the Missouri/Kansas border, where residents first shed blood over the issue slavery. An exploration of this most uncivil of wars provides insight into the ways in which societies can be fragmented by ideology and ultimately rebuilt upon different lines.

Instructor: This course will be taught in an online synchronous instruction mode by Dr. Diane Mutti Burke.

HISTORY 356 Rise of the City in the U.S.

This course treats the background and major developments of the urbanization of the United States. It includes the American urban tradition, the scope of urbanization, colonial beginnings, urban rivalries, promotion, case studies of cities, the growth of urban services, the slum, problems of government, population trends, urban planning, and suburban growth. Consideration is also given to the methods and techniques of urban research and history of the development of this field.

Instructor: This course will be taught in an online synchronous instruction mode by Dr. Sandra Enríquez.

HISTORY 365A American Environmental History

This course examines the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. The main argument of this course will be that American History looks very different through an environmental lens. Nature is an important category of historical analysis – as well as a topic worthy of historical study itself – and this course will examine themes as diverse as Native American ecology to the modern environment crusade.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Brian Frehner.

HISTORY 366RR American Labor History

This course examines the history of work and the working class in the U.S. from 1750 to the present. We will focus on the transformation of the workplace, the rise of the union movement, the nature of cultural and political organizations, workers’ relationships with other social groups, and the role played by gender, race, and ethnicity in uniting or dividing the working class.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by staff at University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*This is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 366RR through Pathway but will be taught via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 379 Museums, Monuments, and American Life: An Introduction to Public History

This course will investigate the ways America commemorates, invokes, and misremembers its history—what scholars call public history. Students will learn the skills professionals use to communicate historical scholarship to wider audiences, and will grapple with the political and ethical issues that arise when we expand the discipline’s stakeholders.

Instructor: This course will be taught in an online synchronous instruction mode by Dr. Sandra Enríquez and in an online asynchronous instruction mode by Dr. Andrew Hurley, Professor of History at University of Missouri-St. Louis.

*The online asynchronous section of this course is a course share course. UMKC students will enroll in History 379 through Pathway but will be taught by Dr. Hurley via UMSL’s Learning Management System.

HISTORY 398 Black Civil Rights in the 20th and 21st Centuries

This course examines the fight for black civil rights in the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, focusing on the Jim Crow period, the fight to end segregation, and the enduring problem of race in the United States.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. Rebecca Davis.

HISTORY 404 Women and Gender in Latin America

This course studies gender in Latin America from the eve of conquest by the Portuguese and Spanish in the fifteenth century to the present. It examines how ideas about gender affected the lives of Latin American men and women. This course additionally analyzes how gender and race contributed to the creation of a hierarchical social order. Finally, it discusses the exercise of authority within and outside households and its impact on private and public spaces.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Viviana Grieco.

HISTORY 464 Medieval Methods and Paleography

This course examines the methodology and historiography of Medieval Studies. Through an introduction to paleography, the study of medieval handwritings, it prepares students for advanced work in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will examine the historical and cultural settings for medieval texts, their physical form and production, as well as the tradition of textural transmission in the medieval world. In addition to gaining familiarity with the many different types of primary sources, such as literary, artistic, legal, and notarial sources, students will be exposed to methods for practical archival work in various European nations.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Linda Mitchell.

HISTORY 470 Ancient Egypt

This course describes the political, social, and cultural evolution of ancient Egypt from pre-dynastic times, with major emphasis upon the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms (especially the 18th dynasty and the reign of Akhenaton).

Instructor: This course will be taught in an online synchronous instruction mode by Dr. Cynthia Jones.

HISTORY 471 Ancient Greece

This course begins with a survey of the pre-classical Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations and then describes the rise of prominent Greek city-states (with particular emphasis upon the evolution of Sparta and the political, social, and cultural contributions of Athens). The course concludes with the rise of Macedon and Alexander’s conquests and significance.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. Massimiliano Vitiello.

HISTORY 498WI Senior Capstone

This is the capstone course in the department and is required for majors. It consists of tutorial sessions with a regular faculty member and independent research leading to a major paper using original source materials.

Instructor: This course will be taught in person by Dr. David Freeman.

Summer 2020

HISTORY 101 U.S. History to 1877

Through lectures, readings, and class discussions, students in this course will learn about the early formation of the colonies, the American Revolution, the National Period, slavery, territorial expansion, and the beginnings of industrialization. The clash of cultures that produced the United States and subsequently affected its development will be emphasized. The course will close by examining the Civil War that nearly destroyed the republic and the attempts to mend the nation’s wounds afterwards. This class will explore a wide variety of historical readings and perspectives encompassing political, economic, social, cultural, racial, military, diplomatic, and gender-related issues.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Matthew Osborn.

HISTORY 102 U.S. History Since 1877

Through lectures, readings, and class discussions, students in this course will learn about industrialization, western migration, imperialism, progressivism, world wars, depression, the cold war, and the emergence of the equal rights movements. The course will close with an examination of the United States on the world stage and the emerging war on terror in the wake of September 11th. This class will explore a wide variety of historical readings and perspectives encompassing political, economic, social, cultural, racial, military, diplomatic, and gender-related issues.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Rebecca Davis.

HISTORY 202 – European History since 1600 

This course surveys the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from about 1600 to the present. Emphasis is given to themes of continuity and change in European culture through the experience of political, scientific, and industrial revolutions; conservative reactions; liberal reforms; nation building; imperialism; two world wars; fascism; communism; and the Cold War.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. David Freeman.

HISTORY 300HW – Special Topics in World History 

Topic: German Migration to Missouri
During the nineteenth century, large numbers of German migrants settled in the state of Missouri. In this three-credit course, students from the universities of Missouri in Kansas City and St. Louis as well as Hamburg, Wroclaw, and Vienna will collaborate on researching and writing short interpretive chapters about the everyday lives of German migrants before, during, and after their migration. The focus of students’ research will be the digitized letters, postcards, and photographs of the Kiefer-Scholtz family from 1899 to the 1920s. While Thekla Scholtz worked as a nanny in Kansas City, among other places, Robert Kiefer worked as a traveling musician and cabinetmaker. The collection records life in Upper Silesia along with their respective travels in Central Europe and the United States. Members of the family fought on both sides of the Great War. This shared, interuniversity, online asynchronous research seminar will be delivered through Canvas. UMKC students will enroll in the course for the intersession term (May 18-29), with extended writing deadlines to August 20, 2020.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Andrew Bergerson.

HISTORY 349 – Civil War in Memory and Film 

This course explores how the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction has been portrayed in film, literature, and art, and if the popular memory of the war accurately reflects the history. We also will discuss how the understanding of this pivotal event in American History has changed over time and how cultural artifacts often say more about the time in which they were produced than the actual history of the Civil War.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Diane Mutti Burke.

HISTORY 406 Modern Latin America

This course studies social, political, economic, and cultural trends in Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussion topics include nation building after independence with an emphasis on gender and race in the creation of national identities and new forms of social stratification; integration of national economies into the world economic system; the expansion of political participation and citizenship; and immigration and the tensions caused by the forces of modernization and tradition.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Viviana Grieco.

HISTORY 474 Late Antiquity: The transformation of the Mediterranean World (200–600 AD)

The decline of the Roman Empire and the barbarian invasions transformed the Mediterranean and European worlds, forming the foundation of Europe and the Islamic world. Students will investigate the multicultural society of Late Antiquity and become familiar with the primary sources for the period.

Instructor: This course will be taught online by Dr. Massimiliano Vitiello.